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A naturalistic evaluation and audit database of agomelatine: clinical outcome at 12 weeks

A naturalistic evaluation and audit database of agomelatine: clinical outcome at 12 weeks
A naturalistic evaluation and audit database of agomelatine: clinical outcome at 12 weeks
OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of agomelatine in routine clinical practice and explore factors associated with response and continuation.

METHOD: Consecutive patients prescribed agomelatine in participating psychiatric services were included. Patient demographic and outcome data were collected at treatment initiation and then at weeks 4, 8 and 12. Outcomes were analysed with respect to clinical and demographic factors.

RESULTS: A total of 110 patients from nine NHS trusts were followed through 12 weeks of treatment. Agomelatine was largely used in difficult-to-treat or refractory patients: 83 (75%) had failed to respond to, or relapsed on, prior antidepressants. There were high rates of physical (54.5%) and psychiatric (50.0%) comorbidity. At 12 weeks of treatment, 68 (62%) continued agomelatine treatment. Overall, 69 subjects (62.7%) improved by at least one point of the Clinical Global Impression (severity) scale. Of 42 who discontinued, 23 (56%) discontinued because of lack of efficacy and 10 (24%) due to an adverse event. Of all variables examined, only a history of more than five episodes of depression significantly predicted discontinuation of treatment (OR continuation - 0.36, 95% CI 0.14, 0.95).

CONCLUSION: Agomelatine was effective and generally well tolerated in a cohort of difficult-to-treat patients in clinical practice.

203-211
Sparshatt, A.
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McAllister Williams, R.H.
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Baldwin, D.S.
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Haddad, P.M.
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Bazire, S.
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Weston, E.
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Taylor, P.
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Taylor, D.
238e3500-b412-4f97-a9c2-d6195a01a0df
Sparshatt, A.
9e5de76c-7a33-40f0-9e9c-482e37efb993
McAllister Williams, R.H.
98f917cc-90cb-4fe0-bf54-c8caa92a001a
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Haddad, P.M.
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Bazire, S.
f077e352-d220-47c9-8588-4b0ec891af0f
Weston, E.
1c171fac-081f-4b00-a5d4-fddeeb16a159
Taylor, P.
28b91e71-fad2-4375-8a1e-535f861901c3
Taylor, D.
238e3500-b412-4f97-a9c2-d6195a01a0df

Sparshatt, A., McAllister Williams, R.H., Baldwin, D.S., Haddad, P.M., Bazire, S., Weston, E., Taylor, P. and Taylor, D. (2013) A naturalistic evaluation and audit database of agomelatine: clinical outcome at 12 weeks. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 128 (3), 203-211. (doi:10.1111/acps.12044).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of agomelatine in routine clinical practice and explore factors associated with response and continuation.

METHOD: Consecutive patients prescribed agomelatine in participating psychiatric services were included. Patient demographic and outcome data were collected at treatment initiation and then at weeks 4, 8 and 12. Outcomes were analysed with respect to clinical and demographic factors.

RESULTS: A total of 110 patients from nine NHS trusts were followed through 12 weeks of treatment. Agomelatine was largely used in difficult-to-treat or refractory patients: 83 (75%) had failed to respond to, or relapsed on, prior antidepressants. There were high rates of physical (54.5%) and psychiatric (50.0%) comorbidity. At 12 weeks of treatment, 68 (62%) continued agomelatine treatment. Overall, 69 subjects (62.7%) improved by at least one point of the Clinical Global Impression (severity) scale. Of 42 who discontinued, 23 (56%) discontinued because of lack of efficacy and 10 (24%) due to an adverse event. Of all variables examined, only a history of more than five episodes of depression significantly predicted discontinuation of treatment (OR continuation - 0.36, 95% CI 0.14, 0.95).

CONCLUSION: Agomelatine was effective and generally well tolerated in a cohort of difficult-to-treat patients in clinical practice.

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Published date: 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 367942
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367942
PURE UUID: 68fe7fef-fa82-4532-863d-3d70f0a43fcc
ORCID for D.S. Baldwin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3343-0907

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Date deposited: 26 Aug 2014 15:39
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:44

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Contributors

Author: A. Sparshatt
Author: R.H. McAllister Williams
Author: D.S. Baldwin ORCID iD
Author: P.M. Haddad
Author: S. Bazire
Author: E. Weston
Author: P. Taylor
Author: D. Taylor

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