The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The economics of flood disaster management in the Netherlands

The economics of flood disaster management in the Netherlands
The economics of flood disaster management in the Netherlands
A cost-benefit analysis of flood disaster managementin the Netherlands is presented in the context of climate change. The costs and benefits of potential emergency measures in designated flood disaster areas are examined. Benefit to cost ratios based on material damage costs are modified based on the assessment of public risk aversion, measured through public willingness to accept compensation (WTAC) for controlled flooding should the designated emergency areas actually be employed in situations of disaster flooding. The estimated WTAC value is an economic indicator of the expected welfare loss due to fear, stress, and social disruption and should be added to the material damage costs of controlled flooding. WTAC is substantial, varying roughly between €185,000 and €370,000 per household per flood event, depending on flood probability and inundation depth, but also on respondent characteristics,such as evacuation history,trust in existing flood emergency plans, fear of flooding and subjective risk perception
9780199841936
296-310
Oxford University Press
Brouwer, Roy
e05861b5-5961-45cd-9de0-883067908c5e
Schaafsma, Marije
937ac629-0fa2-4a11-bdf7-c3688405467d
Guha-Sapir, Debarati
Santos, Indira
Brouwer, Roy
e05861b5-5961-45cd-9de0-883067908c5e
Schaafsma, Marije
937ac629-0fa2-4a11-bdf7-c3688405467d
Guha-Sapir, Debarati
Santos, Indira

Brouwer, Roy and Schaafsma, Marije (2013) The economics of flood disaster management in the Netherlands. In, Guha-Sapir, Debarati and Santos, Indira (eds.) The Economic Impacts of Natural Disasters. Oxford, GB. Oxford University Press, pp. 296-310. (doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199841936.003.0014).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

A cost-benefit analysis of flood disaster managementin the Netherlands is presented in the context of climate change. The costs and benefits of potential emergency measures in designated flood disaster areas are examined. Benefit to cost ratios based on material damage costs are modified based on the assessment of public risk aversion, measured through public willingness to accept compensation (WTAC) for controlled flooding should the designated emergency areas actually be employed in situations of disaster flooding. The estimated WTAC value is an economic indicator of the expected welfare loss due to fear, stress, and social disruption and should be added to the material damage costs of controlled flooding. WTAC is substantial, varying roughly between €185,000 and €370,000 per household per flood event, depending on flood probability and inundation depth, but also on respondent characteristics,such as evacuation history,trust in existing flood emergency plans, fear of flooding and subjective risk perception

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: September 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 368368
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/368368
ISBN: 9780199841936
PURE UUID: b7b9c096-1fb2-4c85-b3e1-0146a1532531

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Sep 2014 07:52
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 01:48

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Roy Brouwer
Editor: Debarati Guha-Sapir
Editor: Indira Santos

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×