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Drowned memories: the submerged places of the Winnemem Wintu

Drowned memories: the submerged places of the Winnemem Wintu
Drowned memories: the submerged places of the Winnemem Wintu
This article is a brief overview of an instance where landscape inundation has disconnected culture from place. The Winnemem Wintu, a Native American tribe in Northern California, had most of their ancestral landscape along the McCloud River submerged by the construction of Shasta Dam just after World War II. The tribe’s remaining traditional cultural properties are under continual threat of loss and/or destruction, leaving the tribe’s ability to practice traditional ceremonies crippled by legal battles and fights against the continual assertion of United States hegemonic power over tribal cultural identity. As part of archaeological research on these submerged places, the tribe’s spiritual leader, Caleen Sisk-Franco, and Tribal Headman, Mark Franco, spoke with the author about these threats and how their culture must adapt to meet them.
winnemem wintu, underwater archaeology, submerged cultural resources, dams, cultural geography, cultural tradition, landscape, place, California
1555-8622
346-371
Garrett, Bradley L.
e51aa011-881c-4284-8889-124b1b52efc7
Garrett, Bradley L.
e51aa011-881c-4284-8889-124b1b52efc7

Garrett, Bradley L. (2010) Drowned memories: the submerged places of the Winnemem Wintu. Archaeologies: The Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, 6 (2), 346-371. (doi:10.1007/s11759-009-9109-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article is a brief overview of an instance where landscape inundation has disconnected culture from place. The Winnemem Wintu, a Native American tribe in Northern California, had most of their ancestral landscape along the McCloud River submerged by the construction of Shasta Dam just after World War II. The tribe’s remaining traditional cultural properties are under continual threat of loss and/or destruction, leaving the tribe’s ability to practice traditional ceremonies crippled by legal battles and fights against the continual assertion of United States hegemonic power over tribal cultural identity. As part of archaeological research on these submerged places, the tribe’s spiritual leader, Caleen Sisk-Franco, and Tribal Headman, Mark Franco, spoke with the author about these threats and how their culture must adapt to meet them.

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More information

Published date: August 2010
Keywords: winnemem wintu, underwater archaeology, submerged cultural resources, dams, cultural geography, cultural tradition, landscape, place, California
Organisations: Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 368982
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/368982
ISSN: 1555-8622
PURE UUID: 99f34f0e-ca6f-4f8f-b3d5-5ceb8e458b86
ORCID for Bradley L. Garrett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0414-3175

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Date deposited: 15 Sep 2014 13:46
Last modified: 07 Aug 2019 00:32

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