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Molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis

Molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis
Molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis
Rapid and sensitive tools for the diagnosis of tuberculosis are needed, due to the increased incidence of tuberculosis epidemics and the length of time required by classical diagnostic tests, especially among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. In this context, the recent advances in cloning and characterization of M. tuberculosis genes has allowed the application of basic molecular biology techniques to the examination of clinical samples, such as sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), for the molecular diagnosis of tuberculous infection. By using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the amplification of mycobacterial nucleic acids and nonradiometric revelation techniques, the time required for the identification of mycobacteria has been considerably shortened (24-48 h), in comparison to the time required by microbiological tests. When PCR technique is performed by experienced laboratory personnel using controlled protocols, false-negative (caused primarily by endogenous polymerase inhibitors) and false-positive results (due to contamination) can generally be avoided, achieving sensitivity and specificity close to 100%. In the clinical practice, the use of molecular testing for the diagnosis of tuberculosis, in combination with "classic" diagnostic tools, can greatly enhance the diagnostic ability of pulmonary clinicians, particularly in paucibacillary infections and in patients with atypical presentation, such as immunodeficient individuals
0904-1850
689s-700s
Richeldi, L.
47177d9c-731a-49a1-9cc6-4ac8f6bbbf26
Barnini, S.
50a5b94f-19ab-48e8-9227-701324986e86
Saltini, C.
511217a8-2901-4ca3-bbdf-b54611e4acc2
Richeldi, L.
47177d9c-731a-49a1-9cc6-4ac8f6bbbf26
Barnini, S.
50a5b94f-19ab-48e8-9227-701324986e86
Saltini, C.
511217a8-2901-4ca3-bbdf-b54611e4acc2

Richeldi, L., Barnini, S. and Saltini, C. (1995) Molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis. European Respiratory Journal Supplement, 20, 689s-700s. (PMID:8590569)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Rapid and sensitive tools for the diagnosis of tuberculosis are needed, due to the increased incidence of tuberculosis epidemics and the length of time required by classical diagnostic tests, especially among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. In this context, the recent advances in cloning and characterization of M. tuberculosis genes has allowed the application of basic molecular biology techniques to the examination of clinical samples, such as sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), for the molecular diagnosis of tuberculous infection. By using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the amplification of mycobacterial nucleic acids and nonradiometric revelation techniques, the time required for the identification of mycobacteria has been considerably shortened (24-48 h), in comparison to the time required by microbiological tests. When PCR technique is performed by experienced laboratory personnel using controlled protocols, false-negative (caused primarily by endogenous polymerase inhibitors) and false-positive results (due to contamination) can generally be avoided, achieving sensitivity and specificity close to 100%. In the clinical practice, the use of molecular testing for the diagnosis of tuberculosis, in combination with "classic" diagnostic tools, can greatly enhance the diagnostic ability of pulmonary clinicians, particularly in paucibacillary infections and in patients with atypical presentation, such as immunodeficient individuals

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Published date: September 1995
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369056
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369056
ISSN: 0904-1850
PURE UUID: 80801ea8-b15e-4c80-b66a-51832c5e8af9

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Date deposited: 09 Oct 2014 10:19
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 01:40

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