The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Fitness consequences of maternal and grandmaternal effects

Fitness consequences of maternal and grandmaternal effects
Fitness consequences of maternal and grandmaternal effects
Transgenerational effects are broader than only parental relationships. Despite mounting evidence that multigenerational effects alter phenotypic and life-history traits, our understanding of how they combine to determine fitness is not well developed because of the added complexity necessary to study them. Here, we derive a quantitative genetic model of adaptation to an extraordinary new environment by an additive genetic component, phenotypic plasticity, maternal and grandmaternal effects. We show how, at equilibrium, negative maternal and negative grandmaternal effects maximize expected population mean fitness. We define negative transgenerational effects as those that have a negative effect on trait expression in the subsequent generation, that is, they slow, or potentially reverse, the expected evolutionary dynamic. When maternal effects are positive, negative grandmaternal effects are preferred. As expected under Mendelian inheritance, the grandmaternal effects have a lower impact on fitness than the maternal effects, but this dual inheritance model predicts a more complex relationship between maternal and grandmaternal effects to constrain phenotypic variance and so maximize expected population mean fitness in the offspring.
3139-3145
Prizak, Roshan
4c48bf45-e6c0-4faa-ae40-18b399ad1d83
Ezard, Thomas H. G.
a143a893-07d0-4673-a2dd-cea2cd7e1374
Hoyle, Rebecca B.
e980d6a8-b750-491b-be13-84d695f8b8a1
Prizak, Roshan
4c48bf45-e6c0-4faa-ae40-18b399ad1d83
Ezard, Thomas H. G.
a143a893-07d0-4673-a2dd-cea2cd7e1374
Hoyle, Rebecca B.
e980d6a8-b750-491b-be13-84d695f8b8a1

Prizak, Roshan, Ezard, Thomas H. G. and Hoyle, Rebecca B. (2014) Fitness consequences of maternal and grandmaternal effects. Ecology and Evolution, 4 (15), 3139-3145. (doi:10.1002/ece3.1150).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Transgenerational effects are broader than only parental relationships. Despite mounting evidence that multigenerational effects alter phenotypic and life-history traits, our understanding of how they combine to determine fitness is not well developed because of the added complexity necessary to study them. Here, we derive a quantitative genetic model of adaptation to an extraordinary new environment by an additive genetic component, phenotypic plasticity, maternal and grandmaternal effects. We show how, at equilibrium, negative maternal and negative grandmaternal effects maximize expected population mean fitness. We define negative transgenerational effects as those that have a negative effect on trait expression in the subsequent generation, that is, they slow, or potentially reverse, the expected evolutionary dynamic. When maternal effects are positive, negative grandmaternal effects are preferred. As expected under Mendelian inheritance, the grandmaternal effects have a lower impact on fitness than the maternal effects, but this dual inheritance model predicts a more complex relationship between maternal and grandmaternal effects to constrain phenotypic variance and so maximize expected population mean fitness in the offspring.

Text
ece31150.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Other.
Download (621kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 18 July 2014
Published date: August 2014
Organisations: Mathematical Sciences, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369271
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369271
PURE UUID: f104acc4-9423-44e6-9401-67bf16a57d5c
ORCID for Thomas H. G. Ezard: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8305-6605
ORCID for Rebecca B. Hoyle: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1645-1071

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Sep 2014 10:23
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:41

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Roshan Prizak
Author: Thomas H. G. Ezard ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×