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Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incident frailty: the English longitudinal study of ageing

Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incident frailty: the English longitudinal study of ageing
Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incident frailty: the English longitudinal study of ageing
Cross-sectional studies show that frailty is common in older people with cardiovascular disease. Whether older people at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease are more likely to become frail is unclear. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine the prospective relation between Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incidence of physical frailty or pre-frailty, defined according to the Fried criteria, in 1,726 men and women aged 60 to over 90 years from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing who had no history of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Men and women with higher Framingham cardiovascular risk scores were more likely to become frail over the 4-year follow-up period. For a standard deviation higher score at baseline, the relative risk ratio (95 % confidence interval) for incident frailty, adjusted for sex and baseline frailty status, was 2.76 (2.18, 3.49). There was a significant association between Framingham cardiovascular risk score and risk of pre-frailty: 1.69 (1.46, 1.95). After further adjustment for other potential confounding factors, the relative risk ratios for frailty and pre-frailty were 2.15 (1.68, 2.75) and 1.50 (1.29, 1.74), respectively. The associations were unchanged after excluding incident cases of cardiovascular disease. Separate adjustment for each component of the risk score suggested that no single component was driving the associations between cardiovascular risk score and incident pre-frailty or frailty. Framingham cardiovascular risk scores may be useful for predicting the development of physical frailty in older people. We now need to understand the biological mechanisms whereby cardiovascular risk increases the risk of frailty.
0161-9152
9692
Gale, Catharine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Sayer, Avan Aihie
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Gale, Catharine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Sayer, Avan Aihie
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb

Gale, Catharine R., Cooper, Cyrus and Sayer, Avan Aihie (2014) Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incident frailty: the English longitudinal study of ageing. Age, 36 (4), 9692. (doi:10.1007/s11357-014-9692-6). (PMID:25085033)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cross-sectional studies show that frailty is common in older people with cardiovascular disease. Whether older people at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease are more likely to become frail is unclear. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine the prospective relation between Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incidence of physical frailty or pre-frailty, defined according to the Fried criteria, in 1,726 men and women aged 60 to over 90 years from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing who had no history of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Men and women with higher Framingham cardiovascular risk scores were more likely to become frail over the 4-year follow-up period. For a standard deviation higher score at baseline, the relative risk ratio (95 % confidence interval) for incident frailty, adjusted for sex and baseline frailty status, was 2.76 (2.18, 3.49). There was a significant association between Framingham cardiovascular risk score and risk of pre-frailty: 1.69 (1.46, 1.95). After further adjustment for other potential confounding factors, the relative risk ratios for frailty and pre-frailty were 2.15 (1.68, 2.75) and 1.50 (1.29, 1.74), respectively. The associations were unchanged after excluding incident cases of cardiovascular disease. Separate adjustment for each component of the risk score suggested that no single component was driving the associations between cardiovascular risk score and incident pre-frailty or frailty. Framingham cardiovascular risk scores may be useful for predicting the development of physical frailty in older people. We now need to understand the biological mechanisms whereby cardiovascular risk increases the risk of frailty.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 2 August 2014
Published date: 2 August 2014
Additional Information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369297
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369297
ISSN: 0161-9152
PURE UUID: 123c0585-e855-4eab-8502-7c8ae4f5cc2e
ORCID for Catharine R. Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 23 Sep 2014 12:44
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:48

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Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Avan Aihie Sayer

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