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The trapping of reactive intermediates using flow chemistry

The trapping of reactive intermediates using flow chemistry
The trapping of reactive intermediates using flow chemistry
Flow chemistry, long established in the bulk chemical industry has recently received more attention in fine chemicals production and discovery chemistry with small-scale apparatus, resulting from laboratory equipment becoming commercially available. The interest in flow chemistry is driven in part by the precise control of reaction parameters, the automation and sequencing of reactions and facile access to certain areas of reaction space. The approach of flow chemistry is rather different to conventional batch chemistry. The dispersion of fluids and the thermic transfer were discussed.

By taking advantage of working in a flow chemistry domain, the generation and trapping of ketenes from thermolysis of alkynyl ethers was developed. Kinetics and activation energy were determined by means of in-situ IR spectroscopy using conventional and improved methodologies. Generation of ketene such as methylene ketene, acyl ketene and vinyl ketene from dioxinone and Meldrum’s acid was also investigated under flow chemistry conditions. Coupled to a custom design of a photo-reactor, the flow apparatus was adapted to perform relevant synthesis of photochemical reaction such as [2+2] cycloaddition, arylation of alkene and SRN1 type reaction. Enabling better access to photochemistry, this photo-flow platform overcomes many limitations associated with batch reactors.
Henry, Cyril
eaaacffd-d2a8-4c17-94b3-ffa2baed89ba
Henry, Cyril
eaaacffd-d2a8-4c17-94b3-ffa2baed89ba
Whitby, Richard
45632236-ab00-4ad0-a02d-6209043e818b

Henry, Cyril (2014) The trapping of reactive intermediates using flow chemistry. University of Southampton, Chemistry, Doctoral Thesis, 373pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Flow chemistry, long established in the bulk chemical industry has recently received more attention in fine chemicals production and discovery chemistry with small-scale apparatus, resulting from laboratory equipment becoming commercially available. The interest in flow chemistry is driven in part by the precise control of reaction parameters, the automation and sequencing of reactions and facile access to certain areas of reaction space. The approach of flow chemistry is rather different to conventional batch chemistry. The dispersion of fluids and the thermic transfer were discussed.

By taking advantage of working in a flow chemistry domain, the generation and trapping of ketenes from thermolysis of alkynyl ethers was developed. Kinetics and activation energy were determined by means of in-situ IR spectroscopy using conventional and improved methodologies. Generation of ketene such as methylene ketene, acyl ketene and vinyl ketene from dioxinone and Meldrum’s acid was also investigated under flow chemistry conditions. Coupled to a custom design of a photo-reactor, the flow apparatus was adapted to perform relevant synthesis of photochemical reaction such as [2+2] cycloaddition, arylation of alkene and SRN1 type reaction. Enabling better access to photochemistry, this photo-flow platform overcomes many limitations associated with batch reactors.

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Published date: 1 September 2014
Organisations: University of Southampton, Chemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369350
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369350
PURE UUID: 61820d4f-649f-46a2-8dfd-85408b1f539c
ORCID for Richard Whitby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9891-5502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Oct 2014 11:49
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:19

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Contributors

Author: Cyril Henry
Thesis advisor: Richard Whitby ORCID iD

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