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The peptide motif of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC can explain the response to a molecular defined vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)

The peptide motif of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC can explain the response to a molecular defined vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)
The peptide motif of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC can explain the response to a molecular defined vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)
In contrast to typical mammals, the chicken MHC (the BF-BL region of the B locus) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to infectious pathogens as well as responses to vaccines. We have shown that the chicken MHC encodes a single dominantly expressed class I molecule whose peptide-binding motifs can determine resistance to viral pathogens, such as Rous sarcoma virus and Marek’s disease virus. In this report, we examine the response to a molecular defined vaccine, fp-IBD1, which consists of a fowlpox virus vector carrying the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) fused with ?-galactosidase. We vaccinated parental lines and two backcross families with fp-IBD1, challenged with the virulent IBDV strain F52/70, and measured damage to the bursa. We found that the MHC haplotype B15 from line 15I confers no protection, whereas B2 from line 61 and B12 from line C determine protection, although another locus from line 61 was also important. Using our peptide motifs, we found that many more peptides from VP2 were predicted to bind to the dominantly expressed class I molecule BF2*1201 than BF2*1501. Moreover, most of the peptides predicted to bind BF2*1201 did in fact bind, while none bound BF2*1501. Using peptide vaccination, we identified one B12 peptide that conferred protection to challenge, as assessed by bursal damage and viremia. Thus, we show the strong genetic association of the chicken MHC to a T cell vaccine can be explained by peptide presentation by the single dominantly expressed class I molecule.
609-618
Butter, Colin
06e17651-5cba-4ff6-81e9-147002932232
Staines, Karen
ef03cec2-cff7-4f8d-b143-4ab04ef54161
van Hateren, Andrew
e345fa3c-d89c-4b91-947e-c1d818cc7f71
Davison, T. Fred
461c23c2-be10-4e89-9988-a2209068d897
Kaufman, Jim
c2afcfb2-dc2b-45af-8c80-83ad341aa78f
Butter, Colin
06e17651-5cba-4ff6-81e9-147002932232
Staines, Karen
ef03cec2-cff7-4f8d-b143-4ab04ef54161
van Hateren, Andrew
e345fa3c-d89c-4b91-947e-c1d818cc7f71
Davison, T. Fred
461c23c2-be10-4e89-9988-a2209068d897
Kaufman, Jim
c2afcfb2-dc2b-45af-8c80-83ad341aa78f

Butter, Colin, Staines, Karen, van Hateren, Andrew, Davison, T. Fred and Kaufman, Jim (2013) The peptide motif of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC can explain the response to a molecular defined vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Immunogenetics, 65 (8), 609-618. (doi:10.1007/s00251-013-0705-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In contrast to typical mammals, the chicken MHC (the BF-BL region of the B locus) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to infectious pathogens as well as responses to vaccines. We have shown that the chicken MHC encodes a single dominantly expressed class I molecule whose peptide-binding motifs can determine resistance to viral pathogens, such as Rous sarcoma virus and Marek’s disease virus. In this report, we examine the response to a molecular defined vaccine, fp-IBD1, which consists of a fowlpox virus vector carrying the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) fused with ?-galactosidase. We vaccinated parental lines and two backcross families with fp-IBD1, challenged with the virulent IBDV strain F52/70, and measured damage to the bursa. We found that the MHC haplotype B15 from line 15I confers no protection, whereas B2 from line 61 and B12 from line C determine protection, although another locus from line 61 was also important. Using our peptide motifs, we found that many more peptides from VP2 were predicted to bind to the dominantly expressed class I molecule BF2*1201 than BF2*1501. Moreover, most of the peptides predicted to bind BF2*1201 did in fact bind, while none bound BF2*1501. Using peptide vaccination, we identified one B12 peptide that conferred protection to challenge, as assessed by bursal damage and viremia. Thus, we show the strong genetic association of the chicken MHC to a T cell vaccine can be explained by peptide presentation by the single dominantly expressed class I molecule.

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Published date: August 2013
Organisations: Cancer Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369352
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369352
PURE UUID: 726d00d0-e733-47f7-99d3-30bf06a56f6b
ORCID for Andrew van Hateren: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3915-0239

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Date deposited: 24 Sep 2014 11:00
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:39

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Contributors

Author: Colin Butter
Author: Karen Staines
Author: Andrew van Hateren ORCID iD
Author: T. Fred Davison
Author: Jim Kaufman

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