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The role of nutritional supplementation on the outcome of superovulation in cattle

The role of nutritional supplementation on the outcome of superovulation in cattle
The role of nutritional supplementation on the outcome of superovulation in cattle
Since the 1990s nutritional supplements including protein, fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals have been used to try and improve the superovulatory response of embryo donors in cattle. However, the accumulated information indicates that nutritional supplementation with protein, fatty acids, or minerals does not increase the number of viable embryos from superovulated cattle. Most of the evidence has shown that vitamin supplementation may increase the mean production of transferable embryos, but only in cows, as a detrimental effect on embryo viability has been reported in young heifers. Nevertheless, vitamin supplementation seems to be effective only when compared with control cows displaying a poor mean embryo production (i.e. less than four viable embryos), questioning the economical significance of such approach. Detrimental effects on embryo development have been reported in superovulated cattle supplemented with protein or fatty acids as well. New approaches to investigate the role of nutritional supplementation on superovulatory outcome in cattle are suggested in the present review. Overall, the available evidence indicates that nutritional supplementation strategies tested are not an effective approach to enhance the superovulatory outcome of well-fed cattle donors.
cattle superovulation, fatty acids, minerals, protein, vitamins
0378-4320
1-10
Velazquez, M.A.
706e7de5-8cdb-4f2b-b47d-128166bdbea4
Velazquez, M.A.
706e7de5-8cdb-4f2b-b47d-128166bdbea4

Velazquez, M.A. (2011) The role of nutritional supplementation on the outcome of superovulation in cattle. Animal Reproduction Science, 126 (1-2), 1-10. (doi:10.1016/j.anireprosci.2011.05.009). (PMID:21676561)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Since the 1990s nutritional supplements including protein, fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals have been used to try and improve the superovulatory response of embryo donors in cattle. However, the accumulated information indicates that nutritional supplementation with protein, fatty acids, or minerals does not increase the number of viable embryos from superovulated cattle. Most of the evidence has shown that vitamin supplementation may increase the mean production of transferable embryos, but only in cows, as a detrimental effect on embryo viability has been reported in young heifers. Nevertheless, vitamin supplementation seems to be effective only when compared with control cows displaying a poor mean embryo production (i.e. less than four viable embryos), questioning the economical significance of such approach. Detrimental effects on embryo development have been reported in superovulated cattle supplemented with protein or fatty acids as well. New approaches to investigate the role of nutritional supplementation on superovulatory outcome in cattle are suggested in the present review. Overall, the available evidence indicates that nutritional supplementation strategies tested are not an effective approach to enhance the superovulatory outcome of well-fed cattle donors.

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More information

Published date: June 2011
Keywords: cattle superovulation, fatty acids, minerals, protein, vitamins
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369451
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369451
ISSN: 0378-4320
PURE UUID: 56010771-a958-41d0-bc65-51437795e01c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Oct 2014 16:34
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:43

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