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Behavioral interventions for children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials across multiple outcome domains

Behavioral interventions for children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials across multiple outcome domains
Behavioral interventions for children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials across multiple outcome domains
OBJECTIVE: Behavioral interventions are recommended as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatments. However, a recent meta-analysis found no effects on core ADHD symptoms when raters were probably blind to treatment allocation. The present analysis is extended to a broader range of child and parent outcomes.

METHOD: A systematic search in PubMed, Ovid, Web of Knowledge, ERIC, and CINAHAL databases (up to February 5, 2013) identified published randomized controlled trials measuring a range of patient and parent outcomes for children and adolescents diagnosed with ADHD (or who met validated cutoffs on rating scales).

RESULTS: Thirty-two of 2,057 nonduplicate screened records were analyzed. For assessments made by individuals closest to the treatment setting (usually unblinded), there were significant improvements in parenting quality (standardized mean difference [SMD] for positive parenting 0.68; SMD for negative parenting 0.57), parenting self-concept (SMD 0.37), and child ADHD (SMD 0.35), conduct problems (SMD 0.26), social skills (SMD 0.47), and academic performance (SMD 0.28). With probably blinded assessments, significant effects persisted for parenting (SMD for positive parenting 0.63; SMD for negative parenting 0.43) and conduct problems (SMD 0.31).

CONCLUSION: In contrast to the lack of blinded evidence of ADHD symptom decrease, behavioral interventions have positive effects on a range of other outcomes when used with patients with ADHD. There is blinded evidence that they improve parenting and decrease childhood conduct problems. These effects also may feed through into a more positive parenting self-concept but not improved parent mental well-being.
1527-5418
835-847
Daley, D.
5435e844-1cad-40a7-9d75-d8bed0cc72eb
Van der Oord, S.
c6f89aff-e14e-419d-9e32-98f91656956f
Ferrin, M.
7d647a18-b4cb-4616-9192-fc88e794a886
Danckaerts, M.
f1067bea-510c-4206-a24d-ecaee0d57d6f
Doepfner, M.
acf2e39d-c3ad-4c5a-8700-0ef8b4992851
Cortese, S.
41e2e5d1-0b3d-40b5-b1db-2aacbdf69bbe
Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Daley, D.
5435e844-1cad-40a7-9d75-d8bed0cc72eb
Van der Oord, S.
c6f89aff-e14e-419d-9e32-98f91656956f
Ferrin, M.
7d647a18-b4cb-4616-9192-fc88e794a886
Danckaerts, M.
f1067bea-510c-4206-a24d-ecaee0d57d6f
Doepfner, M.
acf2e39d-c3ad-4c5a-8700-0ef8b4992851
Cortese, S.
41e2e5d1-0b3d-40b5-b1db-2aacbdf69bbe
Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635

Daley, D., Van der Oord, S., Ferrin, M., Danckaerts, M., Doepfner, M., Cortese, S. and Sonuga-Barke, E.J.S. (2014) Behavioral interventions for children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials across multiple outcome domains. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 53 (8), 835-847. (doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2014.05.013). (PMID:25062591)

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Behavioral interventions are recommended as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatments. However, a recent meta-analysis found no effects on core ADHD symptoms when raters were probably blind to treatment allocation. The present analysis is extended to a broader range of child and parent outcomes.

METHOD: A systematic search in PubMed, Ovid, Web of Knowledge, ERIC, and CINAHAL databases (up to February 5, 2013) identified published randomized controlled trials measuring a range of patient and parent outcomes for children and adolescents diagnosed with ADHD (or who met validated cutoffs on rating scales).

RESULTS: Thirty-two of 2,057 nonduplicate screened records were analyzed. For assessments made by individuals closest to the treatment setting (usually unblinded), there were significant improvements in parenting quality (standardized mean difference [SMD] for positive parenting 0.68; SMD for negative parenting 0.57), parenting self-concept (SMD 0.37), and child ADHD (SMD 0.35), conduct problems (SMD 0.26), social skills (SMD 0.47), and academic performance (SMD 0.28). With probably blinded assessments, significant effects persisted for parenting (SMD for positive parenting 0.63; SMD for negative parenting 0.43) and conduct problems (SMD 0.31).

CONCLUSION: In contrast to the lack of blinded evidence of ADHD symptom decrease, behavioral interventions have positive effects on a range of other outcomes when used with patients with ADHD. There is blinded evidence that they improve parenting and decrease childhood conduct problems. These effects also may feed through into a more positive parenting self-concept but not improved parent mental well-being.

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Published date: 26 June 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369541
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369541
ISSN: 1527-5418
PURE UUID: 8b025380-ca03-4465-a8cd-17ab744e3dc9

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Date deposited: 07 Oct 2014 11:05
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:56

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Contributors

Author: D. Daley
Author: S. Van der Oord
Author: M. Ferrin
Author: M. Danckaerts
Author: M. Doepfner
Author: S. Cortese
Author: E.J.S. Sonuga-Barke

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