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Investigation of capillary wave formation on water streams with internally propagating ultrasound

Investigation of capillary wave formation on water streams with internally propagating ultrasound
Investigation of capillary wave formation on water streams with internally propagating ultrasound
The present work investigates the formation of capillary waves and subsequent breakup on 10 mm and 15 mm diameter water streams (measured at the nozzle exit) with ultrasound propagating at 135 kHz. Experimental observations of the stream breakup process with a high speed camera are reported. The input signal to the transducer was used to investigate the formation and growth of capillary waves. Lateral spraying of the water stream was observed prior to the formation of surface waves. Once the surface waves are formed, they grow in size leading to a necking zone. Necking can, if suffciently large, lead to fragmentation of the stream into globules. The capillary wavelength, lateral spraying velocity and water stream breakup length are measured and presented in an attempt to understand the nature of the breakup process.
Banda, Nikhil
62f136c3-fd7a-4da6-82ec-ac877071b64a
Birkin, Peter R.
ba466560-f27c-418d-89fc-67ea4f81d0a7
Offin, Douglas G.
e7cbc36d-c3ae-431b-9f7a-8c38ccb53579
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Banda, Nikhil
62f136c3-fd7a-4da6-82ec-ac877071b64a
Birkin, Peter R.
ba466560-f27c-418d-89fc-67ea4f81d0a7
Offin, Douglas G.
e7cbc36d-c3ae-431b-9f7a-8c38ccb53579
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae

Banda, Nikhil, Birkin, Peter R., Offin, Douglas G. and Leighton, Timothy G. (2014) Investigation of capillary wave formation on water streams with internally propagating ultrasound. Proceedings of the 7th Forum Acusticum, Poland. 07 - 12 Sep 2014. 4 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The present work investigates the formation of capillary waves and subsequent breakup on 10 mm and 15 mm diameter water streams (measured at the nozzle exit) with ultrasound propagating at 135 kHz. Experimental observations of the stream breakup process with a high speed camera are reported. The input signal to the transducer was used to investigate the formation and growth of capillary waves. Lateral spraying of the water stream was observed prior to the formation of surface waves. Once the surface waves are formed, they grow in size leading to a necking zone. Necking can, if suffciently large, lead to fragmentation of the stream into globules. The capillary wavelength, lateral spraying velocity and water stream breakup length are measured and presented in an attempt to understand the nature of the breakup process.

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More information

Published date: September 2014
Additional Information: Paper R24
Venue - Dates: Proceedings of the 7th Forum Acusticum, Poland, 2014-09-07 - 2014-09-12
Organisations: Chemistry, Inst. Sound & Vibration Research, National Oceanography Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369582
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369582
PURE UUID: 405cd0ca-8f43-42a9-b504-ab85020bcbf4
ORCID for Peter R. Birkin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6656-4074
ORCID for Timothy G. Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Oct 2014 11:15
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:21

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