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Neutrophil elastase (NE) and NE inhibitors: canonical and noncanonical functions in lung chronic inflammatory diseases (cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)

Neutrophil elastase (NE) and NE inhibitors: canonical and noncanonical functions in lung chronic inflammatory diseases (cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
Neutrophil elastase (NE) and NE inhibitors: canonical and noncanonical functions in lung chronic inflammatory diseases (cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
Proteases and antiproteases have multiple important roles both in normal homeostasis and during inflammation. Antiprotease molecules may have developed in a parallel network, consisting of "alarm" and "systemic" inhibitors. Their primary function was thought until recently to mainly prevent the potential injurious effects of excess release of proteolytic enzymes, such as neutrophil elastase (NE), from inflammatory cells. However, recently, new potential roles have been ascribed to these antiproteases. We will review "canonical" and new "noncanonical" functions for these molecules, and more particularly, those pertaining to their role in innate and adaptive immunity (antibacterial activity and biasing of the adaptive immune response).
1941-2711
125-44
Roghanian, Ali
e2b032c2-60a0-4522-a3d8-56a768792f36
Sallenave, Jean-Michel
dbe1dd6a-e3df-48dc-946c-d874b140460f
Roghanian, Ali
e2b032c2-60a0-4522-a3d8-56a768792f36
Sallenave, Jean-Michel
dbe1dd6a-e3df-48dc-946c-d874b140460f

Roghanian, Ali and Sallenave, Jean-Michel (2008) Neutrophil elastase (NE) and NE inhibitors: canonical and noncanonical functions in lung chronic inflammatory diseases (cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, 21 (1), 125-44. (doi:10.1089/jamp.2007.0653). (PMID:18518838)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Proteases and antiproteases have multiple important roles both in normal homeostasis and during inflammation. Antiprotease molecules may have developed in a parallel network, consisting of "alarm" and "systemic" inhibitors. Their primary function was thought until recently to mainly prevent the potential injurious effects of excess release of proteolytic enzymes, such as neutrophil elastase (NE), from inflammatory cells. However, recently, new potential roles have been ascribed to these antiproteases. We will review "canonical" and new "noncanonical" functions for these molecules, and more particularly, those pertaining to their role in innate and adaptive immunity (antibacterial activity and biasing of the adaptive immune response).

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Published date: March 2008
Organisations: Cancer Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 369617
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369617
ISSN: 1941-2711
PURE UUID: 9582b485-7d91-4629-89a2-d3ba5ceb46f3

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Date deposited: 02 Oct 2014 09:17
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:56

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Contributors

Author: Ali Roghanian
Author: Jean-Michel Sallenave

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