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Neural adaptation to non-symbolic number and visual shape: an electrophysiological study

Neural adaptation to non-symbolic number and visual shape: an electrophysiological study
Neural adaptation to non-symbolic number and visual shape: an electrophysiological study
Several studies assumed that the analysis of numerical information happens in a fast and automatic manner in the human brain. Utilizing the high temporal resolution of electroencephalography (EEG) in a passive oddball adaptation paradigm, we compared event-related brain potentials (ERPs) evoked by unattended shape changes and unattended numerosity changes. We controlled visual stimulus properties in a stringent manner. Unattended changes in shape elicited significant, gradual adaptation effects in the range of early visual components, indicating the fast and automatic processing of shapes. Changes in numerosity did not elicit significant changes in these early ERP components. The lack of early number-specific effects was qualified by a significant interaction between Shape and Number conditions. Number change elicited gradual ERP effects only on late ERP components. We conclude that numerosity is a higher-level property assembled from naturally correlating perceptual cues and hence, it is identified later in the cognitive processing stream.
eeg, numerical cognition, neural adaptation, number sense, number comparison
0301-0511
203-211
Soltész, Fruzsina
cbc12e4b-9d6f-4c24-8203-47ae2bd8f470
Dénes, Szűcs
d19aa61c-446b-4b34-8197-9570488122c4
Soltész, Fruzsina
cbc12e4b-9d6f-4c24-8203-47ae2bd8f470
Dénes, Szűcs
d19aa61c-446b-4b34-8197-9570488122c4

Soltész, Fruzsina and Dénes, Szűcs (2014) Neural adaptation to non-symbolic number and visual shape: an electrophysiological study. Biological Psychology, 103, 203-211. (doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2014.09.006). (PMID:25258032)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Several studies assumed that the analysis of numerical information happens in a fast and automatic manner in the human brain. Utilizing the high temporal resolution of electroencephalography (EEG) in a passive oddball adaptation paradigm, we compared event-related brain potentials (ERPs) evoked by unattended shape changes and unattended numerosity changes. We controlled visual stimulus properties in a stringent manner. Unattended changes in shape elicited significant, gradual adaptation effects in the range of early visual components, indicating the fast and automatic processing of shapes. Changes in numerosity did not elicit significant changes in these early ERP components. The lack of early number-specific effects was qualified by a significant interaction between Shape and Number conditions. Number change elicited gradual ERP effects only on late ERP components. We conclude that numerosity is a higher-level property assembled from naturally correlating perceptual cues and hence, it is identified later in the cognitive processing stream.

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Accepted/In Press date: 12 September 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 September 2014
Published date: December 2014
Keywords: eeg, numerical cognition, neural adaptation, number sense, number comparison
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 369906
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369906
ISSN: 0301-0511
PURE UUID: a954bf9f-2ef4-4a86-a541-5bc01ae170f4

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Date deposited: 14 Oct 2014 09:34
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 21:00

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