The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Outsourcing: assessing the risks and benefits for organizations, sectors and nations

Outsourcing: assessing the risks and benefits for organizations, sectors and nations
Outsourcing: assessing the risks and benefits for organizations, sectors and nations
Purpose – This research aims to assess the risks and benefits of outsourcing for organisations, sectors and nations. The literature on outsourcing contains little evidence of research on holistic issues of its impact at systems levels beyond the firm, notably sectors and nations.
Design/methodology/approach – A Delphi study with senior strategists from private and public sectors captured perspectives and specific observations on benefits and risks of outsourcing. Emergent issues on outsourcing policy, strategy and decision-making processes were synthesised into a framework for analysing factors associated with outsourcing.
Findings – The findings suggest that a more holistic view of outsourcing is needed, linking local, organisational issues with sector and national level actions and outcomes. In this way, aggregate risks and benefits can be assessed at different systems levels.
Research limitations/implications – Future research might address the motivations for outsourcing; currently there is little research evidence to assess whether outsourcing is a mechanism for failing to solve internal problems, and moving responsibility and risk out of the firm. Additionally most outsourcing research to date has concentrated on an activity either being “in” or “out”; there is little research exploring the circumstances in which mixed models might be appropriate.
Practical implications – The framework provides an aid to research and an aide memoire for managers considering outsourcing. Originality/value – This paper contributes to knowledge on understanding of outsourcing at different systems levels, particularly highlighting the implications of outsourcing for sectors and nations. Previously most research has focused at the level of the firm or dyadic relationship.
corporate strategy, Delphi method, outsourcing, risk management
0144-3577
831-850
Harland, Christine M.
373781d6-755c-44af-8302-beb81f0c9a49
Knight, Louise A.
80e04470-f2df-4950-9501-1979d9582a79
Lamming, Richard C.
000e9217-49b0-48a3-8f1f-74e0298be998
Walker, Helen
9277a78b-96cc-4cea-93bc-65b1b55959e9
Harland, Christine M.
373781d6-755c-44af-8302-beb81f0c9a49
Knight, Louise A.
80e04470-f2df-4950-9501-1979d9582a79
Lamming, Richard C.
000e9217-49b0-48a3-8f1f-74e0298be998
Walker, Helen
9277a78b-96cc-4cea-93bc-65b1b55959e9

Harland, Christine M., Knight, Louise A., Lamming, Richard C. and Walker, Helen (2005) Outsourcing: assessing the risks and benefits for organizations, sectors and nations. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 25 (9), 831-850. (doi:10.1108/01443570510613929).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose – This research aims to assess the risks and benefits of outsourcing for organisations, sectors and nations. The literature on outsourcing contains little evidence of research on holistic issues of its impact at systems levels beyond the firm, notably sectors and nations.
Design/methodology/approach – A Delphi study with senior strategists from private and public sectors captured perspectives and specific observations on benefits and risks of outsourcing. Emergent issues on outsourcing policy, strategy and decision-making processes were synthesised into a framework for analysing factors associated with outsourcing.
Findings – The findings suggest that a more holistic view of outsourcing is needed, linking local, organisational issues with sector and national level actions and outcomes. In this way, aggregate risks and benefits can be assessed at different systems levels.
Research limitations/implications – Future research might address the motivations for outsourcing; currently there is little research evidence to assess whether outsourcing is a mechanism for failing to solve internal problems, and moving responsibility and risk out of the firm. Additionally most outsourcing research to date has concentrated on an activity either being “in” or “out”; there is little research exploring the circumstances in which mixed models might be appropriate.
Practical implications – The framework provides an aid to research and an aide memoire for managers considering outsourcing. Originality/value – This paper contributes to knowledge on understanding of outsourcing at different systems levels, particularly highlighting the implications of outsourcing for sectors and nations. Previously most research has focused at the level of the firm or dyadic relationship.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: September 2005
Keywords: corporate strategy, Delphi method, outsourcing, risk management

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 37003
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/37003
ISSN: 0144-3577
PURE UUID: 8edc0091-151a-49ae-a0cd-fad602ef12ee

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:04

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Christine M. Harland
Author: Louise A. Knight
Author: Richard C. Lamming
Author: Helen Walker

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×