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Diagnosis and management of drug allergy in adults, children and young people: summary of NICE guidance

Diagnosis and management of drug allergy in adults, children and young people: summary of NICE guidance
Diagnosis and management of drug allergy in adults, children and young people: summary of NICE guidance
All drugs have the potential to cause side effects or “adverse drug reactions,” but not all of these are allergic in nature. The diagnosis of drug allergy can be challenging, and there is considerable variation both in how drug allergy is managed and in geographical access to specialist drug allergy services.1 On the basis of a National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) analysis of hospital episode statistics, about half a million people admitted to NHS hospitals each year in England and Wales have a diagnostic label of “drug allergy,” with the most common being penicillin allergy.2 Fewer than 10% of people who think they are allergic to penicillin are truly allergic.3 Inadequate clinical documentation of allergic drug reactions and a lack of patient information (provided to and by patients) may lead to an inappropriate label of allergy to penicillin or other drugs remaining on a medical record. This can prevent future prescription even when clinically indicated. This article summarises the most recent recommendations from NICE on drug allergy
0959-8138
1-4
Dworzynski, Katharina
e8a6aa72-c6b1-4971-b416-396448a5e9f8
Ardern-Jones, Michael
7ac43c24-94ab-4d19-ba69-afaa546bec90
Nasser, Shuaib
af9a64df-12cb-4594-bcab-3e3ccd37cc19
Dworzynski, Katharina
e8a6aa72-c6b1-4971-b416-396448a5e9f8
Ardern-Jones, Michael
7ac43c24-94ab-4d19-ba69-afaa546bec90
Nasser, Shuaib
af9a64df-12cb-4594-bcab-3e3ccd37cc19

Dworzynski, Katharina, Ardern-Jones, Michael and Nasser, Shuaib (2014) Diagnosis and management of drug allergy in adults, children and young people: summary of NICE guidance. BMJ, 349 (g4852), 1-4. (doi:10.1136/bmj.g4852). (PMID:25186447)

Record type: Article

Abstract

All drugs have the potential to cause side effects or “adverse drug reactions,” but not all of these are allergic in nature. The diagnosis of drug allergy can be challenging, and there is considerable variation both in how drug allergy is managed and in geographical access to specialist drug allergy services.1 On the basis of a National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) analysis of hospital episode statistics, about half a million people admitted to NHS hospitals each year in England and Wales have a diagnostic label of “drug allergy,” with the most common being penicillin allergy.2 Fewer than 10% of people who think they are allergic to penicillin are truly allergic.3 Inadequate clinical documentation of allergic drug reactions and a lack of patient information (provided to and by patients) may lead to an inappropriate label of allergy to penicillin or other drugs remaining on a medical record. This can prevent future prescription even when clinically indicated. This article summarises the most recent recommendations from NICE on drug allergy

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e-pub ahead of print date: 3 September 2014
Published date: 3 September 2014
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 370232
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370232
ISSN: 0959-8138
PURE UUID: 2340c787-064c-454d-8c8a-56c806d2cd8f

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Date deposited: 24 Oct 2014 15:31
Last modified: 08 Sep 2017 16:32

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Contributors

Author: Katharina Dworzynski
Author: Shuaib Nasser

University divisions

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