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A case study of the D4R laptop

A case study of the D4R laptop
A case study of the D4R laptop
The D4R (Design for recycling, repair, refurbishment and reuse) laptop was developed in conjunction with MicroPro Computers (MPC), a Dublin-based computer manufacturer. MPC formed an industrial network with end-of-life information technology (IT) asset management firms, IT refurbishers, component manufacturers and local industries to produce a new design that has created a new use for their wastes, thus turning waste into resources. This has been made possible through: D4R product design features that facilitate integration of by-product materials and components into the manufacturing process; the creation of an industrial network of suppliers and local assembly agencies permitting industrial metabolism of by-product materials and components into state-of-the-art laptop products; and the creation of a resource exchange platform that increases the visibility of by-products to be incorporated in newly manufactured systems. MPC has been able to successfully manufacture a universal shell composed of a motherboard and a six-cell lithium battery, encapsulated in a wooden housing structure. The shell is capable of accepting new laptop system components and also has the ability to integrate various diverse parts and components, and parts and components of different specifications. The proposed manufacturing model illustrates an entirely novel approach to industrial networking in computer manufacturing for the purpose of eliminating waste and creating valuable by-products.
1747-6526
101-108
Hickey, S.
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Fitzpatrick, C.
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Maher, P.
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Ospina, J.
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Schischke, K.
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Beigl, P.
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Vidorreta, I.
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Yang, M.
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Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Hickey, S.
a240993a-43f3-422e-8dba-44cb9ad9fb94
Fitzpatrick, C.
ebb92a29-6c1b-4ee3-bf05-982761289e3b
Maher, P.
db6e4df9-3d46-40d2-9b95-5c7ea47f01d5
Ospina, J.
2027a057-dfa6-40c4-9b2a-d347aed928f7
Schischke, K.
bad12be1-880c-430f-8e91-e2bd2e3e8b48
Beigl, P.
8480bd52-4675-4153-bcf8-fd12b9b35c00
Vidorreta, I.
d7414bef-cb72-4a64-a0c1-e62711cd0b41
Yang, M.
10224d09-ea3b-40f9-8d15-513652d644b7
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22

Hickey, S., Fitzpatrick, C., Maher, P., Ospina, J., Schischke, K., Beigl, P., Vidorreta, I., Yang, M. and Williams, I.D. (2014) A case study of the D4R laptop. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Waste and Resource Management, 167 (WR3), 101-108. (doi:10.1680/warm.13.00031).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The D4R (Design for recycling, repair, refurbishment and reuse) laptop was developed in conjunction with MicroPro Computers (MPC), a Dublin-based computer manufacturer. MPC formed an industrial network with end-of-life information technology (IT) asset management firms, IT refurbishers, component manufacturers and local industries to produce a new design that has created a new use for their wastes, thus turning waste into resources. This has been made possible through: D4R product design features that facilitate integration of by-product materials and components into the manufacturing process; the creation of an industrial network of suppliers and local assembly agencies permitting industrial metabolism of by-product materials and components into state-of-the-art laptop products; and the creation of a resource exchange platform that increases the visibility of by-products to be incorporated in newly manufactured systems. MPC has been able to successfully manufacture a universal shell composed of a motherboard and a six-cell lithium battery, encapsulated in a wooden housing structure. The shell is capable of accepting new laptop system components and also has the ability to integrate various diverse parts and components, and parts and components of different specifications. The proposed manufacturing model illustrates an entirely novel approach to industrial networking in computer manufacturing for the purpose of eliminating waste and creating valuable by-products.

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Published date: 2 May 2014
Organisations: Centre for Environmental Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 370292
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370292
ISSN: 1747-6526
PURE UUID: 0caf9154-3940-41b5-a274-f5419189c9e3
ORCID for I.D. Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Oct 2014 12:38
Last modified: 12 Nov 2019 01:47

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