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Anomalous electrical resistivity anisotropy in clean reservoir sandstones

Anomalous electrical resistivity anisotropy in clean reservoir sandstones
Anomalous electrical resistivity anisotropy in clean reservoir sandstones
We report novel laboratory measurements of the full electrical resistivity tensor in reservoir analogue quartzose sandstones with clay contents less than 1.5%. We show that clean, homogeneous, visually uniform sandstone samples typically display between 15% and 25% resistivity anisotropy with minimum resistivity normal to the bedding plane. Thin-section petrography, analysis of fabric anisotropy, and comparison to finite-element simulations of grain pack compaction show that the observed anisotropy symmetries and magnitudes can be explained by syn-depositional and post-depositional compaction processes. Our findings suggest that: electrical resistivity anisotropy is likely to be present in most clastic rocks as a consequence of ballistic deposition and compaction; compaction may be deduced from measurements of electrical anisotropy; and the anisotropy observed at larger scales in well logging and controlled-source electromagnetic data, with maximum resistivity normal to bedding, is most likely the result of meso-scale (10?1 m–101 m) periodic layering of electrically dissimilar lithologies.
Sandstone, Electrical anisotropy, Porosity, Compaction
0016-8025
1315-1326
North, Laurence J.
65837b6b-40f1-4a1c-ba66-ec6ff2d7f84b
Best, Angus I.
cad03726-10f8-4f90-a3ba-5031665234c9
North, Laurence J.
65837b6b-40f1-4a1c-ba66-ec6ff2d7f84b
Best, Angus I.
cad03726-10f8-4f90-a3ba-5031665234c9

North, Laurence J. and Best, Angus I. (2014) Anomalous electrical resistivity anisotropy in clean reservoir sandstones. Geophysical Prospecting, 62 (6), 1315-1326. (doi:10.1111/1365-2478.12183).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We report novel laboratory measurements of the full electrical resistivity tensor in reservoir analogue quartzose sandstones with clay contents less than 1.5%. We show that clean, homogeneous, visually uniform sandstone samples typically display between 15% and 25% resistivity anisotropy with minimum resistivity normal to the bedding plane. Thin-section petrography, analysis of fabric anisotropy, and comparison to finite-element simulations of grain pack compaction show that the observed anisotropy symmetries and magnitudes can be explained by syn-depositional and post-depositional compaction processes. Our findings suggest that: electrical resistivity anisotropy is likely to be present in most clastic rocks as a consequence of ballistic deposition and compaction; compaction may be deduced from measurements of electrical anisotropy; and the anisotropy observed at larger scales in well logging and controlled-source electromagnetic data, with maximum resistivity normal to bedding, is most likely the result of meso-scale (10?1 m–101 m) periodic layering of electrically dissimilar lithologies.

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More information

Published date: November 2014
Keywords: Sandstone, Electrical anisotropy, Porosity, Compaction
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Marine Geoscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 370297
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370297
ISSN: 0016-8025
PURE UUID: e85a60f8-cb69-4bcd-bf5f-795181997ce5

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Oct 2014 13:27
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:41

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