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The future of scholarly communications

The future of scholarly communications
The future of scholarly communications
The academic publishing industry is set to celebrate 350 years of peer-reviewed scientific journals. However, there are significant shifts in the practice of scholarship, as scholars and citizens alike participate in an increasingly digital world. Is the scholarly article still fit for its purpose in this data-driven world, with new interdisciplinary methodologies and increasing automation? How might it be enhanced or replaced with new kinds of digital research objects , so as not to restrict innovation but rather create a flourishing sense-making network of humans and machines? The emerging paradigm of social machines provides a lens onto future developments in scholarship and scholarly collaboration, as we live and study in a hybrid physical-digital sociotechnical system of enormous and growing scale.

Copyright 2014 David De Roure. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ which permits unrestricted use and distribution provided the original author and source are credited. If reusing please acknowledge "Insights: the UKSG journal" as the place of first publication. Please cite using the full DOI as specified at the end of the article: De Roure, D, The future of scholarly communications, Insights, 2014, 27(3), 233–238; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1629/2048-7754.171
233-238
De Roure, David
02879140-3508-4db9-a7f4-d114421375da
De Roure, David
02879140-3508-4db9-a7f4-d114421375da

De Roure, David (2014) The future of scholarly communications. Insights: the UKSG journal, 27 (3), 233-238. (doi:10.1629/2048-7754.171).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The academic publishing industry is set to celebrate 350 years of peer-reviewed scientific journals. However, there are significant shifts in the practice of scholarship, as scholars and citizens alike participate in an increasingly digital world. Is the scholarly article still fit for its purpose in this data-driven world, with new interdisciplinary methodologies and increasing automation? How might it be enhanced or replaced with new kinds of digital research objects , so as not to restrict innovation but rather create a flourishing sense-making network of humans and machines? The emerging paradigm of social machines provides a lens onto future developments in scholarship and scholarly collaboration, as we live and study in a hybrid physical-digital sociotechnical system of enormous and growing scale.

Copyright 2014 David De Roure. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ which permits unrestricted use and distribution provided the original author and source are credited. If reusing please acknowledge "Insights: the UKSG journal" as the place of first publication. Please cite using the full DOI as specified at the end of the article: De Roure, D, The future of scholarly communications, Insights, 2014, 27(3), 233–238; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1629/2048-7754.171

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e-pub ahead of print date: 3 November 2014
Published date: 3 November 2014
Additional Information: Copyright 2014 David De Roure. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ which permits unrestricted use and distribution provided the original author and source are credited. If reusing please acknowledge "Insights: the UKSG journal" as the place of first publication. Please cite using the full DOI as specified at the end of the article: De Roure, D, The future of scholarly communications, Insights, 2014, 27(3), 233–238; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1629/2048-7754.171
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 370703
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370703
PURE UUID: de665b90-28d4-4300-b4ee-1a229e5e836f
ORCID for David De Roure: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9074-3016

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Date deposited: 04 Nov 2014 11:33
Last modified: 03 Jul 2018 00:36

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Author: David De Roure ORCID iD

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