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The translingual imagination in the work of four women poets of German-Jewish origin

The translingual imagination in the work of four women poets of German-Jewish origin
The translingual imagination in the work of four women poets of German-Jewish origin
In this thesis, I am developing a theory of the translingual imagination which can be used as a tool to explore literature written in a second language. The term ‘translingual imagination’ was first coined by Steven Kellman in his essay ‘Translingualism and the Literary Imagination’, describing the work of authors writing in a language other than their first. Recent years have seen a growing body of research on these writers, not least because of a risen interest in post-colonial writing and transnational and migration studies. Literary scholars have increasingly questioned ‘the paradigma of monolingualism’, and linguistic research has looked at interrelations between migration,language and identity. However, research projects have often focused on prose writing, predominantly examining the work of canonized male authors (such as Kafka, Conrad or Rushdie), and post-war migrants(such as Turkish-born authors writing in German, or South American-born writers writing in English). Poetry written by women poets of German-Jewish origin has mainly been considered part of Holocaust writing, and over the past decades German scholars have been trying to reclaim these texts as ‘German -Jewish’ poetry. My thesis considers the work of four English poets of German-Jewish origin in the context of translingual writing. While using Kellman’s term, I shall suggest a set of specific criteria to allow for a clearer definition of the ‘translingual imagination’. In applying these criteria to the work of women poets of German-Jewish origin, I will not only show the translingual imagination at work but also encourage a new reading of literature written by German-Jewish refugees that goes beyond the notion of exile poetry.
Reintjes, Meike
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Reintjes, Meike
228358a0-7d80-4c01-af83-e7b2ecad7802
Orr, Mary
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Reiter, Andrea
2d3fad43-ac1d-4ec7-bd9f-0b9168492a84
Mccall, Ian
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Reintjes, Meike (2014) The translingual imagination in the work of four women poets of German-Jewish origin. University of Southampton, Faculty of Humanities, Doctoral Thesis, 245pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

In this thesis, I am developing a theory of the translingual imagination which can be used as a tool to explore literature written in a second language. The term ‘translingual imagination’ was first coined by Steven Kellman in his essay ‘Translingualism and the Literary Imagination’, describing the work of authors writing in a language other than their first. Recent years have seen a growing body of research on these writers, not least because of a risen interest in post-colonial writing and transnational and migration studies. Literary scholars have increasingly questioned ‘the paradigma of monolingualism’, and linguistic research has looked at interrelations between migration,language and identity. However, research projects have often focused on prose writing, predominantly examining the work of canonized male authors (such as Kafka, Conrad or Rushdie), and post-war migrants(such as Turkish-born authors writing in German, or South American-born writers writing in English). Poetry written by women poets of German-Jewish origin has mainly been considered part of Holocaust writing, and over the past decades German scholars have been trying to reclaim these texts as ‘German -Jewish’ poetry. My thesis considers the work of four English poets of German-Jewish origin in the context of translingual writing. While using Kellman’s term, I shall suggest a set of specific criteria to allow for a clearer definition of the ‘translingual imagination’. In applying these criteria to the work of women poets of German-Jewish origin, I will not only show the translingual imagination at work but also encourage a new reading of literature written by German-Jewish refugees that goes beyond the notion of exile poetry.

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More information

Published date: 1 March 2014
Organisations: University of Southampton, Modern Languages

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 370710
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370710
PURE UUID: cdd569a0-8c1f-475b-91aa-154bf1e911a6

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Date deposited: 04 Nov 2014 15:42
Last modified: 08 Aug 2017 04:01

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Contributors

Author: Meike Reintjes
Thesis advisor: Mary Orr
Thesis advisor: Andrea Reiter
Thesis advisor: Ian Mccall

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