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Dangerous Politics: Risk, political vulnerability and penal policy

Dangerous Politics: Risk, political vulnerability and penal policy
Dangerous Politics: Risk, political vulnerability and penal policy
The IPP sentence, in its form and effects, stands as one of the most striking examples of the rise of preventive justice in Western democracies. A life sentence in all but name, it has contributed to an astonishing growth in the indeterminate prison population: England and Wales now has more indeterminate sentenced prisoners than Germany, France and Italy combined. This book engages with this crucial development in penal policy, with in-depth analysis that is of international relevance.

Dangerous Politics draws on over 60 in-depth interviews with key policymakers to tease out the beliefs, traditions and political processes that propelled the creation, contestation and ultimate demise of the Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentence.

Dangerous Politics makes an original contribution to our understanding of the genesis and demise of the IPP sentence, and to our broader understanding of the nature of penality in early 21st century Britain. It brings together relevant literature in law, criminology and politics to provide insights into the nature of British penal politics, the role of the judiciary and pressure groups, and the interrelation between risk, the ‘public voice’ and penal politics.
978-0-19-872860-3
Oxford University Press
Annison, Harry
91ee5a4a-811e-4b57-9fd4-df643465b2a1
Annison, Harry
91ee5a4a-811e-4b57-9fd4-df643465b2a1

Annison, Harry (2015) Dangerous Politics: Risk, political vulnerability and penal policy , Oxford, GB. Oxford University Press

Record type: Book

Abstract

The IPP sentence, in its form and effects, stands as one of the most striking examples of the rise of preventive justice in Western democracies. A life sentence in all but name, it has contributed to an astonishing growth in the indeterminate prison population: England and Wales now has more indeterminate sentenced prisoners than Germany, France and Italy combined. This book engages with this crucial development in penal policy, with in-depth analysis that is of international relevance.

Dangerous Politics draws on over 60 in-depth interviews with key policymakers to tease out the beliefs, traditions and political processes that propelled the creation, contestation and ultimate demise of the Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentence.

Dangerous Politics makes an original contribution to our understanding of the genesis and demise of the IPP sentence, and to our broader understanding of the nature of penality in early 21st century Britain. It brings together relevant literature in law, criminology and politics to provide insights into the nature of British penal politics, the role of the judiciary and pressure groups, and the interrelation between risk, the ‘public voice’ and penal politics.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 8 October 2015
Organisations: Southampton Law School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 370732
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370732
ISBN: 978-0-19-872860-3
PURE UUID: 95393e08-4592-48d5-a862-a26e6f842fe3
ORCID for Harry Annison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6042-038X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Nov 2014 11:54
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:24

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