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A tale of two scenes: civic capital and retaining musical talent in Toronto and Halifax

A tale of two scenes: civic capital and retaining musical talent in Toronto and Halifax
A tale of two scenes: civic capital and retaining musical talent in Toronto and Halifax
Although Toronto has been the centre of the Canadian music industry for many decades, recent interviews reveal that industrial restructuring may be affecting the choices that musicians make about where to live and work. In an era of contemporary independent music production, some smaller city-regions, such as Halifax, Nova Scotia, are becoming more attractive to musicians. This article explores the ways in which musicians consider the economic and social dynamics of city-regions in making their location choices. Musicians recognize Toronto's advantages in size and economic opportunity, yet those in the music scene described it as an intensely competitive and difficult work environment. By contrast, respondents in Halifax talked about a supportive and collaborative community that welcomed newcomers, encouraged performance, and facilitated creativity. In the contemporary context, where independent musicians are adopting new strategies to pursue their vocation, communities high in civic capital may gain an advantage in attracting and retaining talent
music, civic capital, Toronto, halifax, social dynamics
365-382
Hracs, B.J.
ab1df99d-bb99-4770-9ea1-b9d654a284dc
Grant, J.L.
175b37d8-bae1-48d2-8339-7ef77b2206f1
Haggett, J.
25139db7-f4d6-4c16-9a68-cc5a6160fa8a
Morton, J.
164e3cdc-f677-49e0-a774-a6a04f1b6d82
Hracs, B.J.
ab1df99d-bb99-4770-9ea1-b9d654a284dc
Grant, J.L.
175b37d8-bae1-48d2-8339-7ef77b2206f1
Haggett, J.
25139db7-f4d6-4c16-9a68-cc5a6160fa8a
Morton, J.
164e3cdc-f677-49e0-a774-a6a04f1b6d82

Hracs, B.J., Grant, J.L., Haggett, J. and Morton, J. (2011) A tale of two scenes: civic capital and retaining musical talent in Toronto and Halifax. The Canadian Geographer, 55 (3), 365-382. (doi:10.1111/j.1541-0064.2011.00364.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although Toronto has been the centre of the Canadian music industry for many decades, recent interviews reveal that industrial restructuring may be affecting the choices that musicians make about where to live and work. In an era of contemporary independent music production, some smaller city-regions, such as Halifax, Nova Scotia, are becoming more attractive to musicians. This article explores the ways in which musicians consider the economic and social dynamics of city-regions in making their location choices. Musicians recognize Toronto's advantages in size and economic opportunity, yet those in the music scene described it as an intensely competitive and difficult work environment. By contrast, respondents in Halifax talked about a supportive and collaborative community that welcomed newcomers, encouraged performance, and facilitated creativity. In the contemporary context, where independent musicians are adopting new strategies to pursue their vocation, communities high in civic capital may gain an advantage in attracting and retaining talent

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 27 June 2011
Published date: 2011
Keywords: music, civic capital, Toronto, halifax, social dynamics
Organisations: Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 370767
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370767
PURE UUID: cba90f42-0cdf-41b6-843d-2c2553c85ee8
ORCID for B.J. Hracs: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1001-6877

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Nov 2014 10:57
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:22

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