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The restructuring of academic work in Australia: power, management and gender

The restructuring of academic work in Australia: power, management and gender
The restructuring of academic work in Australia: power, management and gender
This paper examines how the restructuring of Australia's university system and the introduction of corporate managerialism has changed the work performed by academic staff. The paper illustrates how the emergence of higher education as both a major export industry and a vehicle for attaining greater international competitiveness has led to more intense regulation of academic work. Within a context of funding cutbacks, substantial inequities have emerged between and within universities, as they compete more aggressively for higher education markets. Hierarchical line management, with clear divisions between different categories of academic staff, has substantially replaced collegial forms of administration. This paper demonstrates how these processes have worked to undermine the effective implementation of Equal Employment Opportunity initiatives, as women remain concentrated in the lowest paid and least secure positions within universities.
0142-5692
257-267
Lafferty, George
cbae418b-1b7c-4dbb-b9ec-a088ff5511de
Fleming, Jenny
61449384-ccab-40b3-b494-0852c956ca19
Lafferty, George
cbae418b-1b7c-4dbb-b9ec-a088ff5511de
Fleming, Jenny
61449384-ccab-40b3-b494-0852c956ca19

Lafferty, George and Fleming, Jenny (2000) The restructuring of academic work in Australia: power, management and gender. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 21 (2), 257-267. (doi:10.1080/713655344).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper examines how the restructuring of Australia's university system and the introduction of corporate managerialism has changed the work performed by academic staff. The paper illustrates how the emergence of higher education as both a major export industry and a vehicle for attaining greater international competitiveness has led to more intense regulation of academic work. Within a context of funding cutbacks, substantial inequities have emerged between and within universities, as they compete more aggressively for higher education markets. Hierarchical line management, with clear divisions between different categories of academic staff, has substantially replaced collegial forms of administration. This paper demonstrates how these processes have worked to undermine the effective implementation of Equal Employment Opportunity initiatives, as women remain concentrated in the lowest paid and least secure positions within universities.

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More information

Published date: 28 June 2000
Organisations: Faculty of Social, Human and Mathematical Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 370787
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370787
ISSN: 0142-5692
PURE UUID: d6866f28-13a3-473a-b4c0-5b6671338229
ORCID for Jenny Fleming: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7913-3345

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Nov 2014 12:25
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:38

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Contributors

Author: George Lafferty
Author: Jenny Fleming ORCID iD

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