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Cancer survivors’ self-efficacy to self-manage in the year following primary treatment

Cancer survivors’ self-efficacy to self-manage in the year following primary treatment
Cancer survivors’ self-efficacy to self-manage in the year following primary treatment
PURPOSE:

Cancer survivors are increasingly expected to manage the consequences of cancer and its treatment for themselves. There is evidence that self-efficacy is important for successful self-management and that this can be enhanced with support. The purpose of this study was to assess self-efficacy to manage problems in the year following primary treatment.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional online survey included cancer survivors who had completed their treatment within the past 12 months. Self-efficacy was assessed and variables expected to be associated with self-efficacy were measured using validated scales including quality of life, well-being, illness perceptions, depression and social support.

RESULTS:

One hundred eighty-two respondents (mean age 50; 81 % female) completed the survey. They had been treated for a range of cancers; most commonly breast (45 %). Self-efficacy scores varied between individuals and according to the illness-related task to be managed. Respondents were least confident in managing fatigue and most confident in accessing information about their cancer. Individuals most likely to report low self-efficacy were women, those experiencing higher levels of pain and/or depression, lower well-being scores, lower socio-economic status, low levels of social support, or a more negative perception of cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

Self-efficacy to self-manage problems faced as a consequence of cancer and its treatment can vary widely in the year following treatment. Fatigue may be particularly difficult to manage.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS:

Variations in self-efficacy highlight the importance of assessing specific problems faced and people's confidence to manage them in order to tailor appropriate self-management support.
self-management, cancer survivors, self-efficacy, confidence, neoplasms
1932-2259
Foster, C.
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Breckons, M.
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Cotterell, P.
34ced262-73fd-4635-ba0d-82fdf5c58fa2
Barbosa, D.
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Calman, L.
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1
Corner, J.
eddc9d69-aa12-4de5-8ab0-b20a6b5765fa
Fenlon, D.
52f9a9f1-1643-449c-9856-258ef563342c
Foster, R.
Grimmett, C.
7f27e85b-2850-481d-a7dd-2835e1a925cd
Richardson, A.
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Smith, P.W.
961a01a3-bf4c-43ca-9599-5be4fd5d3940
Foster, C.
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Breckons, M.
34f3308d-b5be-4633-9a3e-229da659f7be
Cotterell, P.
34ced262-73fd-4635-ba0d-82fdf5c58fa2
Barbosa, D.
1d2c8382-6782-4475-a921-92f796aac5dd
Calman, L.
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1
Corner, J.
eddc9d69-aa12-4de5-8ab0-b20a6b5765fa
Fenlon, D.
52f9a9f1-1643-449c-9856-258ef563342c
Foster, R.
Grimmett, C.
7f27e85b-2850-481d-a7dd-2835e1a925cd
Richardson, A.
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Smith, P.W.
961a01a3-bf4c-43ca-9599-5be4fd5d3940

Foster, C., Breckons, M., Cotterell, P., Barbosa, D., Calman, L., Corner, J., Fenlon, D., Foster, R., Grimmett, C., Richardson, A. and Smith, P.W. (2014) Cancer survivors’ self-efficacy to self-manage in the year following primary treatment. Journal of Cancer Survivorship. (doi:10.1007/s11764-014-0384-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Cancer survivors are increasingly expected to manage the consequences of cancer and its treatment for themselves. There is evidence that self-efficacy is important for successful self-management and that this can be enhanced with support. The purpose of this study was to assess self-efficacy to manage problems in the year following primary treatment.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional online survey included cancer survivors who had completed their treatment within the past 12 months. Self-efficacy was assessed and variables expected to be associated with self-efficacy were measured using validated scales including quality of life, well-being, illness perceptions, depression and social support.

RESULTS:

One hundred eighty-two respondents (mean age 50; 81 % female) completed the survey. They had been treated for a range of cancers; most commonly breast (45 %). Self-efficacy scores varied between individuals and according to the illness-related task to be managed. Respondents were least confident in managing fatigue and most confident in accessing information about their cancer. Individuals most likely to report low self-efficacy were women, those experiencing higher levels of pain and/or depression, lower well-being scores, lower socio-economic status, low levels of social support, or a more negative perception of cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

Self-efficacy to self-manage problems faced as a consequence of cancer and its treatment can vary widely in the year following treatment. Fatigue may be particularly difficult to manage.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS:

Variations in self-efficacy highlight the importance of assessing specific problems faced and people's confidence to manage them in order to tailor appropriate self-management support.

Text
Foster Online survey J Cancer Survivorship 2014.pdf - Other
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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 16 July 2014
Published date: 16 July 2014
Keywords: self-management, cancer survivors, self-efficacy, confidence, neoplasms
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 370831
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/370831
ISSN: 1932-2259
PURE UUID: 5a0f6878-1f5c-4f5e-81d4-f7b1a08c4b14
ORCID for C. Foster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4703-8378
ORCID for L. Calman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9964-6017
ORCID for C. Grimmett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7540-7206
ORCID for A. Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3127-5755
ORCID for P.W. Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4423-5410

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Nov 2014 09:35
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 07:48

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