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Coarse-to-fine eye-movement behavior during visual search

Coarse-to-fine eye-movement behavior during visual search
Coarse-to-fine eye-movement behavior during visual search
It has previously been argued that, during visual search, eye movement behavior is indicative of an underlying scanning “strategy” that starts on a global, or “coarse,” scale but then progressively focuses to a more local, or “fine,” scale. This conclusion is motivated by the finding that, as a trial progresses, fixation durations tend to increase and saccade amplitudes tend to decrease. In the present study, we replicate these effects but offer an alternative explanation for them—that they emerge from a few stochastic factors that control eye movement behavior. We report the results of a simulation supporting this hypothesis and discuss implications for future models of visual search.
1244-1249
Godwin, H.J.
df22dc0c-01d1-440a-a369-a763801851e5
Reichle, E.D.
44dc4e6a-e5e2-47c5-9a09-2ef759db0583
Menneer, T.
d684eaf6-1494-4004-9973-cb8ccc628efa
Godwin, H.J.
df22dc0c-01d1-440a-a369-a763801851e5
Reichle, E.D.
44dc4e6a-e5e2-47c5-9a09-2ef759db0583
Menneer, T.
d684eaf6-1494-4004-9973-cb8ccc628efa

Godwin, H.J., Reichle, E.D. and Menneer, T. (2014) Coarse-to-fine eye-movement behavior during visual search. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21 (5), 1244-1249. (doi:10.3758/s13423-014-0613-6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

It has previously been argued that, during visual search, eye movement behavior is indicative of an underlying scanning “strategy” that starts on a global, or “coarse,” scale but then progressively focuses to a more local, or “fine,” scale. This conclusion is motivated by the finding that, as a trial progresses, fixation durations tend to increase and saccade amplitudes tend to decrease. In the present study, we replicate these effects but offer an alternative explanation for them—that they emerge from a few stochastic factors that control eye movement behavior. We report the results of a simulation supporting this hypothesis and discuss implications for future models of visual search.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 3 April 2014
Published date: 3 April 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 371679
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/371679
PURE UUID: 8d95b284-a3ad-40df-ba18-119b925961b8

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Date deposited: 12 Nov 2014 12:36
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:39

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