The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Introduction: Interpretation in the study of Australian politics and policy

Introduction: Interpretation in the study of Australian politics and policy
Introduction: Interpretation in the study of Australian politics and policy
Amid the clamour of recent calls for evidence-based policymaking, citizen-centred governance, open government, and any number of other international trends in the business of public administration, another, less-heralded one has quietly taken root in Australia: a call to put interpretation at the centre of our analysis. As the self-made image of the objective civil servant slowly erodes in Australia, as elsewhere, there is growing acknowledgment that what the evidence says, how citizens should be involved, what open government means and entails, or indeed the significance and implications of any other trend in public administration, must be subject to interpretation of the actors involved. This is not to advance the notion of a new post-modern orthodoxy in thinking about Australian politics and policy—as fairly obviously no such orthodoxy exists—but rather to point out that an interest in subjective meaning is no longer the domain of the academic fringe. To mainstream policy and public administration scholars and practitioners alike, then, increasingly interpretation matters. That is not to say it didn't matter before – our contribution to this collection aims to show that to some extent it always has – but that the advent of ‘interpretivism’ (the inevitable ‘ism’ that emerged to attach itself to a particular interest of scholars in interpretation in politics and policymaking) has brought sharper focus to its significance, both in theory and practice.
0313-6647
291-295
Boswell, John
34bad0df-3d4d-40ce-948f-65871e3d783c
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Boswell, John
34bad0df-3d4d-40ce-948f-65871e3d783c
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2

Boswell, John and Corbett, Jack (2014) Introduction: Interpretation in the study of Australian politics and policy. [in special issue: Symposium: Interpretation in the Study of Australian Politics and Policy] Australian Journal of Public Administration, 73 (3), 291-295. (doi:10.1111/1467-8500.12082).

Record type: Special issue

Abstract

Amid the clamour of recent calls for evidence-based policymaking, citizen-centred governance, open government, and any number of other international trends in the business of public administration, another, less-heralded one has quietly taken root in Australia: a call to put interpretation at the centre of our analysis. As the self-made image of the objective civil servant slowly erodes in Australia, as elsewhere, there is growing acknowledgment that what the evidence says, how citizens should be involved, what open government means and entails, or indeed the significance and implications of any other trend in public administration, must be subject to interpretation of the actors involved. This is not to advance the notion of a new post-modern orthodoxy in thinking about Australian politics and policy—as fairly obviously no such orthodoxy exists—but rather to point out that an interest in subjective meaning is no longer the domain of the academic fringe. To mainstream policy and public administration scholars and practitioners alike, then, increasingly interpretation matters. That is not to say it didn't matter before – our contribution to this collection aims to show that to some extent it always has – but that the advent of ‘interpretivism’ (the inevitable ‘ism’ that emerged to attach itself to a particular interest of scholars in interpretation in politics and policymaking) has brought sharper focus to its significance, both in theory and practice.

Text
AJPA Special Issue Introduction Final libre.pdf - Author's Original
Download (80kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 23 September 2014
Published date: 2014
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 371698
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/371698
ISSN: 0313-6647
PURE UUID: b2ffff2f-e98a-46c2-ba8f-2bf5d1a6c3aa
ORCID for John Boswell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3018-8791
ORCID for Jack Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-7162

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Nov 2014 09:41
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 03:04

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×