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Surface warming hiatus caused by increased heat uptake across multiple ocean basins

Surface warming hiatus caused by increased heat uptake across multiple ocean basins
Surface warming hiatus caused by increased heat uptake across multiple ocean basins
The first decade of the twenty-first century was characterised by a hiatus in global surface warming. Using ocean model hindcasts and reanalyses we show that heat uptake between the 1990s and 2000s increased by 0.7 ± 0.3Wm-2. Approximately 30% of the increase is associated with colder sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific. Other basins contribute via reduced heat loss to the atmosphere, in particular the Southern and subtropical Indian Oceans (30%), and the subpolar North Atlantic (40%). A different mechanism is important at longer timescales (1960s-present) over which the Southern Annular Mode trended upwards. In this period, increased ocean heat uptake has largely arisen from reduced heat loss associated with reduced winds over the Agulhas Return Current and southward displacement of Southern Ocean westerlies.
climate hiatus
0094-8276
7868-7874
Drijfhout, S.S.
a5c76079-179b-490c-93fe-fc0391aacf13
Blaker, A.T.
94efe8b2-c744-4e90-87d7-db19ffa41200
Josey, S.A.
2252ab7f-5cd2-49fd-a951-aece44553d93
Nurser, A.J.G.
2493ef9a-21e9-4d8b-9c32-08677e7e145a
Sinha, B.
544b5a07-3d74-464b-9470-a68c69bd722e
Balmaseda, M.A.
77e9dbb3-fabd-4dfd-abce-a25a5e4cce32
Drijfhout, S.S.
a5c76079-179b-490c-93fe-fc0391aacf13
Blaker, A.T.
94efe8b2-c744-4e90-87d7-db19ffa41200
Josey, S.A.
2252ab7f-5cd2-49fd-a951-aece44553d93
Nurser, A.J.G.
2493ef9a-21e9-4d8b-9c32-08677e7e145a
Sinha, B.
544b5a07-3d74-464b-9470-a68c69bd722e
Balmaseda, M.A.
77e9dbb3-fabd-4dfd-abce-a25a5e4cce32

Drijfhout, S.S., Blaker, A.T., Josey, S.A., Nurser, A.J.G., Sinha, B. and Balmaseda, M.A. (2014) Surface warming hiatus caused by increased heat uptake across multiple ocean basins. Geophysical Research Letters, 41 (22), 7868-7874. (doi:10.1002/2014GL061456).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The first decade of the twenty-first century was characterised by a hiatus in global surface warming. Using ocean model hindcasts and reanalyses we show that heat uptake between the 1990s and 2000s increased by 0.7 ± 0.3Wm-2. Approximately 30% of the increase is associated with colder sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific. Other basins contribute via reduced heat loss to the atmosphere, in particular the Southern and subtropical Indian Oceans (30%), and the subpolar North Atlantic (40%). A different mechanism is important at longer timescales (1960s-present) over which the Southern Annular Mode trended upwards. In this period, increased ocean heat uptake has largely arisen from reduced heat loss associated with reduced winds over the Agulhas Return Current and southward displacement of Southern Ocean westerlies.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 25 November 2014
Published date: 28 November 2014
Keywords: climate hiatus
Organisations: Marine Systems Modelling, Physical Oceanography, Marine Physics and Ocean Climate

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Local EPrints ID: 371752
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/371752
ISSN: 0094-8276
PURE UUID: 4d1f78fa-464e-4280-938b-e8135e2f322a

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Date deposited: 13 Nov 2014 13:38
Last modified: 02 Mar 2022 17:34

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Contributors

Author: S.S. Drijfhout
Author: A.T. Blaker
Author: S.A. Josey
Author: A.J.G. Nurser
Author: B. Sinha
Author: M.A. Balmaseda

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