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Predictors of protective behaviour against ticks in the UK: A mixed methods study

Predictors of protective behaviour against ticks in the UK: A mixed methods study
Predictors of protective behaviour against ticks in the UK: A mixed methods study
The objective of this research was to determine the most appropriate protective behaviours to promote in order to protect members of the public from Lyme borreliosis, to identify the drivers and barriers for these behaviours, and to determine the strongest predictors of tick-protective behaviour. We used a mixed methods study with qualitative interviews and a quantitative web survey. Interviews with topic experts and members of the public suggested that predictors of tick checking included perceived disease likelihood and severity as well as overall awareness of ticks and tick-borne disease. Twenty-four percent of participants regularly checked for ticks after walking in a tick-endemic area. The strongest predictors of checking for ticks were greater levels of knowledge, perceived likelihood of being bitten, self-efficacy about tick removal, and lower levels of disgust about ticks. Barriers to checking included forgetfulness and lacking time. At-risk members of the UK public require information to increase awareness of ticks and protective behaviours, particularly tick checking. Information may be most effective if it focuses on increasing self-efficacy while also reducing disgust
1877-959X
392-400
Mowbray, Fiona
0a9e37a7-06c7-4926-95cb-af2d1eb22157
Amlot, Richard
0e8d2aed-ab3b-4922-b058-5e7e91f491df
Rubin, G James
ccd521c5-642e-4fb7-be85-44aa758332d6
Mowbray, Fiona
0a9e37a7-06c7-4926-95cb-af2d1eb22157
Amlot, Richard
0e8d2aed-ab3b-4922-b058-5e7e91f491df
Rubin, G James
ccd521c5-642e-4fb7-be85-44aa758332d6

Mowbray, Fiona, Amlot, Richard and Rubin, G James (2014) Predictors of protective behaviour against ticks in the UK: A mixed methods study. Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, 5 (4), 392-400. (doi:10.1016/j.ttbdis.2014.01.006). (PMID:24713278)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The objective of this research was to determine the most appropriate protective behaviours to promote in order to protect members of the public from Lyme borreliosis, to identify the drivers and barriers for these behaviours, and to determine the strongest predictors of tick-protective behaviour. We used a mixed methods study with qualitative interviews and a quantitative web survey. Interviews with topic experts and members of the public suggested that predictors of tick checking included perceived disease likelihood and severity as well as overall awareness of ticks and tick-borne disease. Twenty-four percent of participants regularly checked for ticks after walking in a tick-endemic area. The strongest predictors of checking for ticks were greater levels of knowledge, perceived likelihood of being bitten, self-efficacy about tick removal, and lower levels of disgust about ticks. Barriers to checking included forgetfulness and lacking time. At-risk members of the UK public require information to increase awareness of ticks and protective behaviours, particularly tick checking. Information may be most effective if it focuses on increasing self-efficacy while also reducing disgust

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More information

Published date: June 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 371859
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/371859
ISSN: 1877-959X
PURE UUID: 46fb52c2-162d-4dac-921a-756db6791988
ORCID for Fiona Mowbray: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3297-4163

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Nov 2014 09:40
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:22

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