The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Beyond decoding: phonological processing during silent reading in beginning readers

Beyond decoding: phonological processing during silent reading in beginning readers
Beyond decoding: phonological processing during silent reading in beginning readers
In this experiment, the extent to which beginning readers process phonology during lexical identification in silent sentence reading was investigated. The eye movements of children aged seven to nine years and adults were recorded as they read sentences containing either a correctly spelled target word (e.g., girl), a pseudohomophone (e.g., gerl), or a spelling control (e.g., garl). Both children and adults showed a benefit from the valid phonology of the pseudohomophone, compared to the spelling control during reading. This indicates that children as young as seven years old exhibit relatively skilled phonological processing during reading, despite having moved past the use of overt phonological decoding strategies. In addition, in comparison to adults, children’s lexical processing was more disrupted by the presence of spelling errors, suggesting a developmental change in the relative dependence upon phonological and orthographic processing in lexical identification during silent sentence reading.
0278-7393
1244-1252
Blythe, Hazel I.
51835633-e40b-4e8b-ae49-ad6b2f927f4c
Pagan, A.
884fbea0-cae4-4a5f-a026-baebb158c5b2
Dodd, M.
3b711e13-cf24-4707-a042-ceeca4680bf4
Blythe, Hazel I.
51835633-e40b-4e8b-ae49-ad6b2f927f4c
Pagan, A.
884fbea0-cae4-4a5f-a026-baebb158c5b2
Dodd, M.
3b711e13-cf24-4707-a042-ceeca4680bf4

Blythe, Hazel I., Pagan, A. and Dodd, M. (2015) Beyond decoding: phonological processing during silent reading in beginning readers. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition, 41 (4), 1244-1252. (doi:10.1037/xlm0000080).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this experiment, the extent to which beginning readers process phonology during lexical identification in silent sentence reading was investigated. The eye movements of children aged seven to nine years and adults were recorded as they read sentences containing either a correctly spelled target word (e.g., girl), a pseudohomophone (e.g., gerl), or a spelling control (e.g., garl). Both children and adults showed a benefit from the valid phonology of the pseudohomophone, compared to the spelling control during reading. This indicates that children as young as seven years old exhibit relatively skilled phonological processing during reading, despite having moved past the use of overt phonological decoding strategies. In addition, in comparison to adults, children’s lexical processing was more disrupted by the presence of spelling errors, suggesting a developmental change in the relative dependence upon phonological and orthographic processing in lexical identification during silent sentence reading.

Text
Blythe et al.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 December 2014
Published date: July 2015
Organisations: Cognition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 371889
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/371889
ISSN: 0278-7393
PURE UUID: a078589a-15e8-4999-aade-343edae53839

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Nov 2014 09:45
Last modified: 27 May 2020 16:53

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×