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Feeding requirements of white sharks may be higher than originally thought

Feeding requirements of white sharks may be higher than originally thought
Feeding requirements of white sharks may be higher than originally thought
Quantifying the energy requirements of animals in nature is critical for understanding physiological, behavioural, and ecosystem ecology; however, for difficult-to-study species such as large sharks, prey intake rates are largely unknown. Here, we use metabolic rates derived from swimming speed estimates to suggest that feeding requirements of the world's largest predatory fish, the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), are several times higher than previously proposed. Further, our estimates of feeding frequency identify a clear benefit in seasonal selection of pinniped colonies - a white shark foraging strategy seen across much of their range.
Ecophysiology, Feeding behaviour, Animal physiology, Animal behaviour
1471
Semmens, J.M.
eb2b7e60-509f-4897-887f-3e7aa4ba80c8
Payne, N.L.
92f8be56-fd6d-4a9e-8d3a-e1f2fb7c0bc0
Huveneers, C.
71285575-62dd-4c1a-8f49-519b58c0ec41
Sims, D.W.
7234b444-25e2-4bd5-8348-a1c142d0cf81
Bruce, B.D.
8367ac25-9f3b-4055-9203-18a36968f5e3
Semmens, J.M.
eb2b7e60-509f-4897-887f-3e7aa4ba80c8
Payne, N.L.
92f8be56-fd6d-4a9e-8d3a-e1f2fb7c0bc0
Huveneers, C.
71285575-62dd-4c1a-8f49-519b58c0ec41
Sims, D.W.
7234b444-25e2-4bd5-8348-a1c142d0cf81
Bruce, B.D.
8367ac25-9f3b-4055-9203-18a36968f5e3

Semmens, J.M., Payne, N.L., Huveneers, C., Sims, D.W. and Bruce, B.D. (2013) Feeding requirements of white sharks may be higher than originally thought. Scientific Reports, 3, 1471. (doi:10.1038/srep01471).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Quantifying the energy requirements of animals in nature is critical for understanding physiological, behavioural, and ecosystem ecology; however, for difficult-to-study species such as large sharks, prey intake rates are largely unknown. Here, we use metabolic rates derived from swimming speed estimates to suggest that feeding requirements of the world's largest predatory fish, the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), are several times higher than previously proposed. Further, our estimates of feeding frequency identify a clear benefit in seasonal selection of pinniped colonies - a white shark foraging strategy seen across much of their range.

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More information

Published date: 13 March 2013
Keywords: Ecophysiology, Feeding behaviour, Animal physiology, Animal behaviour
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 371931
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/371931
PURE UUID: 80d75ecf-cbc9-476d-9c0c-f0136e4eaaeb

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Date deposited: 19 Nov 2014 14:18
Last modified: 26 Apr 2022 18:00

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Contributors

Author: J.M. Semmens
Author: N.L. Payne
Author: C. Huveneers
Author: D.W. Sims
Author: B.D. Bruce

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