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Optimizing engagement with internet-based health behaviour change interventions: comparison of self-assessment with and without tailored feedback using a mixed methods approach

Optimizing engagement with internet-based health behaviour change interventions: comparison of self-assessment with and without tailored feedback using a mixed methods approach
Optimizing engagement with internet-based health behaviour change interventions: comparison of self-assessment with and without tailored feedback using a mixed methods approach
Objectives: internet-based health behaviour interventions have variable effects on health-related outcomes. Effectiveness may be improved by optimizing the design of interventions. This study examined the specific effect on engagement of providing two different design features – tailoring and self-assessment.

Design: three versions of an Internet-delivered intervention to support the self-care of mild bowel problems were developed that provided (1) self-assessment without tailored feedback, (2) self-assessment with tailored feedback, and (3) generic information only.

Methods: a qualitative study explored participants' engagement with each version of the intervention (N = 24). A larger quantitative study systematically compared participants' use of the intervention and self-reported engagement using a partial factorial design (n = 178).

Results: findings from the qualitative study suggested that self-assessment without tailored feedback appeared to be less acceptable to participants because it was viewed as offering no personal benefit in the absence of personalized advice. In the quantitative study, self-assessment without tailored feedback was associated with greater dropout than when provided in conjunction with tailored feedback. There were significant group differences in participants' engagement with the intervention and perceptions of the intervention. Self-assessment without tailored feedback was rated as marginally less engaging and was associated with fewer positive perceptions than the generic information condition.

Conclusions: the acceptability of self-assessment or monitoring components may be optimized by also providing tailored feedback. Without tailored feedback, these components do not appear to be any more engaging than generic information provision
1359-107X
839-855
Morrison, Leanne
920a4eda-0f9d-4bd9-842d-6873b1afafef
Moss-Morris, Rona
b98a6345-64f7-437f-b6d4-3cf5a911f8fe
Michie, Susan
47e0a907-79cb-47d5-b5a9-82d2afe1747a
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Morrison, Leanne
920a4eda-0f9d-4bd9-842d-6873b1afafef
Moss-Morris, Rona
b98a6345-64f7-437f-b6d4-3cf5a911f8fe
Michie, Susan
47e0a907-79cb-47d5-b5a9-82d2afe1747a
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e

Morrison, Leanne, Moss-Morris, Rona, Michie, Susan and Yardley, Lucy (2014) Optimizing engagement with internet-based health behaviour change interventions: comparison of self-assessment with and without tailored feedback using a mixed methods approach. British Journal of Health Psychology, 19 (4), 839-855. (doi:10.1111/bjhp.12083). (PMID:24308806)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: internet-based health behaviour interventions have variable effects on health-related outcomes. Effectiveness may be improved by optimizing the design of interventions. This study examined the specific effect on engagement of providing two different design features – tailoring and self-assessment.

Design: three versions of an Internet-delivered intervention to support the self-care of mild bowel problems were developed that provided (1) self-assessment without tailored feedback, (2) self-assessment with tailored feedback, and (3) generic information only.

Methods: a qualitative study explored participants' engagement with each version of the intervention (N = 24). A larger quantitative study systematically compared participants' use of the intervention and self-reported engagement using a partial factorial design (n = 178).

Results: findings from the qualitative study suggested that self-assessment without tailored feedback appeared to be less acceptable to participants because it was viewed as offering no personal benefit in the absence of personalized advice. In the quantitative study, self-assessment without tailored feedback was associated with greater dropout than when provided in conjunction with tailored feedback. There were significant group differences in participants' engagement with the intervention and perceptions of the intervention. Self-assessment without tailored feedback was rated as marginally less engaging and was associated with fewer positive perceptions than the generic information condition.

Conclusions: the acceptability of self-assessment or monitoring components may be optimized by also providing tailored feedback. Without tailored feedback, these components do not appear to be any more engaging than generic information provision

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e-pub ahead of print date: 6 December 2013
Published date: November 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 371971
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/371971
ISSN: 1359-107X
PURE UUID: e83a25f4-7aab-48b8-aa78-dfae87a63840
ORCID for Leanne Morrison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9961-551X
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

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Date deposited: 21 Nov 2014 15:04
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:11

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Contributors

Author: Leanne Morrison ORCID iD
Author: Rona Moss-Morris
Author: Susan Michie
Author: Lucy Yardley ORCID iD

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