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The complexity of obesity in UK adolescents: relationships with quantity and type of technology, sleep, academic performance and aspiration

The complexity of obesity in UK adolescents: relationships with quantity and type of technology, sleep, academic performance and aspiration
The complexity of obesity in UK adolescents: relationships with quantity and type of technology, sleep, academic performance and aspiration
BACKGROUND:

Contemporary technology and multiple device use may link to increased body mass index (BMI). The sleep-obesity relationship is inconsistent in adolescents. Sleep duration and quality may have crucial connections to obesity development, particularly in adolescents where sleep alterations are common. Elevated BMI in adolescents may influence academic performance and aspiration, but data are limited.
OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of this study was to assess the linear associations between BMI?z-score and (i) quantity/type of technology used; (ii) sleep quantity/quality and (iii) academic performance/aspiration.
METHODS:

Consenting adolescents (n?=?624; 64.9% girls, aged 11-18 years) were recruited. The Schools Sleep Habits Survey and Technology Use Questionnaire were administered. Objective measures of height/weight were obtained.
RESULTS:

Quantity of technology was positively associated with BMI?z-score ??=?0.10, P?<?0.01. Those who always engaged in video gaming had significantly higher BMI?z-score vs. never-users, ??=?1.00, P?<?0.001. Weekday sleep duration and sleep onset latency were related to BMI?z-score, ??=?-0.24, P?<?0.001 and ??=?0.01, P?<?0.001, respectively. An inverse linear association was observed between BMI?z-score and academic performance, ??=?-0.68, P?<?0.001.
CONCLUSIONS:

If confirmed prospectively, reducing bedtime use of technology and improving sleep hygiene in adolescents could be an achievable intervention for attenuating obesity with potentially positive effects on academic performance.
2047-6302
358-366
Arora, T.
68b9f09d-3bb7-460f-8f0c-6e1fe805162f
Araghi, M.
abe40a7d-18e9-4e42-8b21-a24b814f4168
Bishop, J.
5e554fde-3a5e-41b4-a385-ec7f68326fd8
Yao, G.
d777f84c-cf3d-4fad-bbc1-ea01dec01695
Thomas, G.N.
3635b162-ce4e-4257-86a1-992b7a570505
Taheri, S.
27680e3f-1654-4a07-bc9d-e8a9dcb621a7
Arora, T.
68b9f09d-3bb7-460f-8f0c-6e1fe805162f
Araghi, M.
abe40a7d-18e9-4e42-8b21-a24b814f4168
Bishop, J.
5e554fde-3a5e-41b4-a385-ec7f68326fd8
Yao, G.
d777f84c-cf3d-4fad-bbc1-ea01dec01695
Thomas, G.N.
3635b162-ce4e-4257-86a1-992b7a570505
Taheri, S.
27680e3f-1654-4a07-bc9d-e8a9dcb621a7

Arora, T., Araghi, M., Bishop, J., Yao, G., Thomas, G.N. and Taheri, S. (2013) The complexity of obesity in UK adolescents: relationships with quantity and type of technology, sleep, academic performance and aspiration. Pediatric Obesity, 8 (5), 358-366. (doi:10.1111/j.2047-6310.2012.00119.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Contemporary technology and multiple device use may link to increased body mass index (BMI). The sleep-obesity relationship is inconsistent in adolescents. Sleep duration and quality may have crucial connections to obesity development, particularly in adolescents where sleep alterations are common. Elevated BMI in adolescents may influence academic performance and aspiration, but data are limited.
OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of this study was to assess the linear associations between BMI?z-score and (i) quantity/type of technology used; (ii) sleep quantity/quality and (iii) academic performance/aspiration.
METHODS:

Consenting adolescents (n?=?624; 64.9% girls, aged 11-18 years) were recruited. The Schools Sleep Habits Survey and Technology Use Questionnaire were administered. Objective measures of height/weight were obtained.
RESULTS:

Quantity of technology was positively associated with BMI?z-score ??=?0.10, P?<?0.01. Those who always engaged in video gaming had significantly higher BMI?z-score vs. never-users, ??=?1.00, P?<?0.001. Weekday sleep duration and sleep onset latency were related to BMI?z-score, ??=?-0.24, P?<?0.001 and ??=?0.01, P?<?0.001, respectively. An inverse linear association was observed between BMI?z-score and academic performance, ??=?-0.68, P?<?0.001.
CONCLUSIONS:

If confirmed prospectively, reducing bedtime use of technology and improving sleep hygiene in adolescents could be an achievable intervention for attenuating obesity with potentially positive effects on academic performance.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: October 2013
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372008
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372008
ISSN: 2047-6302
PURE UUID: b7226db9-a897-4544-997b-c5465f22f53b

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Nov 2014 15:26
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:37

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