The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The sensitivity of estimates of the change in population behaviour to realistic changes in bias in repeated surveys

The sensitivity of estimates of the change in population behaviour to realistic changes in bias in repeated surveys
The sensitivity of estimates of the change in population behaviour to realistic changes in bias in repeated surveys
The first British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (NATSAL) was conducted in 1990–1991 and the second in 1999–2001. When surveys are repeated, the changes in population parameters are of interest and are generally estimated from a comparison of the data between surveys. However, since all surveys may be subject to bias, such comparisons may partly reflect a change in bias. Typically limited external data are available to estimate the change in bias directly. However, one approach, which is often possible, is to define in each survey a sample of participants who are eligible for both surveys, and then to compare the reporting of selected events that occurred before the earlier survey time point. A difference in reporting suggests a change in overall survey bias between time points, although other explanations are possible. In NATSAL, changes in bias are likely to be similar for groups of sexual experiences. The grouping of experiences allows the information that is derived from the selected events to be incorporated into inference concerning population changes in other sexual experiences. We use generalized estimating equations, which incorporate weighting for differential probabilities of sampling and non-response in a relatively straightforward manner. The results, combined with estimates of the change in reporting, are used to derive minimum established population changes, based on NATSAL data. For some key population parameters, the change in reporting is seen to be consistent with a change in bias alone. Recommendations are made for the design of future surveys.
bias, generalized estimating equations, sexual behaviour survey, survey analysis, weighted data
0964-1998
579-595
Copas, A.J.
b32e4bde-8420-4e5a-8fd2-b0a7f45f64ad
Farewell, V.
11c80570-0a41-472b-84c4-2216c252061f
Mercer, C.M.
40f4b51e-c5bc-4e72-900c-8fb0b80a5db1
Yao, G.
d777f84c-cf3d-4fad-bbc1-ea01dec01695
Copas, A.J.
b32e4bde-8420-4e5a-8fd2-b0a7f45f64ad
Farewell, V.
11c80570-0a41-472b-84c4-2216c252061f
Mercer, C.M.
40f4b51e-c5bc-4e72-900c-8fb0b80a5db1
Yao, G.
d777f84c-cf3d-4fad-bbc1-ea01dec01695

Copas, A.J., Farewell, V., Mercer, C.M. and Yao, G. (2004) The sensitivity of estimates of the change in population behaviour to realistic changes in bias in repeated surveys. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society), 167 (4), 579-595. (doi:10.1111/j.1467-985X.2004.00706.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The first British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (NATSAL) was conducted in 1990–1991 and the second in 1999–2001. When surveys are repeated, the changes in population parameters are of interest and are generally estimated from a comparison of the data between surveys. However, since all surveys may be subject to bias, such comparisons may partly reflect a change in bias. Typically limited external data are available to estimate the change in bias directly. However, one approach, which is often possible, is to define in each survey a sample of participants who are eligible for both surveys, and then to compare the reporting of selected events that occurred before the earlier survey time point. A difference in reporting suggests a change in overall survey bias between time points, although other explanations are possible. In NATSAL, changes in bias are likely to be similar for groups of sexual experiences. The grouping of experiences allows the information that is derived from the selected events to be incorporated into inference concerning population changes in other sexual experiences. We use generalized estimating equations, which incorporate weighting for differential probabilities of sampling and non-response in a relatively straightforward manner. The results, combined with estimates of the change in reporting, are used to derive minimum established population changes, based on NATSAL data. For some key population parameters, the change in reporting is seen to be consistent with a change in bias alone. Recommendations are made for the design of future surveys.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 24 September 2004
Published date: November 2004
Keywords: bias, generalized estimating equations, sexual behaviour survey, survey analysis, weighted data
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372026
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372026
ISSN: 0964-1998
PURE UUID: 59c1b5cc-338e-40b9-80fb-db68196133fa

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Dec 2014 16:28
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×