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Child-related characteristics predicting subsequent health-related quality of life in 8- to 14-year-old children with and without cerebellar tumors: a prospective longitudinal study

Child-related characteristics predicting subsequent health-related quality of life in 8- to 14-year-old children with and without cerebellar tumors: a prospective longitudinal study
Child-related characteristics predicting subsequent health-related quality of life in 8- to 14-year-old children with and without cerebellar tumors: a prospective longitudinal study
Background

We identified child-related determinants of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children aged 8–14 years who were treated for 2 common types of pediatric brain tumors.

Methods

Questionnaire measures of HRQoL and psychometric assessments were completed by 110 children on 3 occasions over 24 months. Of these 110, 72 were within 3 years of diagnosis of a cerebellar tumor (37 standard-risk medulloblastoma, 35 low-grade cerebellar astrocytoma), and 38 were in a nontumor group. HRQoL, executive function, health status, and behavioral difficulties were also assessed by parents and teachers as appropriate. Regression modeling was used to relate HRQoL z scores to age, sex, socioeconomic status, and 5 domains of functioning: Cognition, Emotion, Social, Motor and Sensory, and Behavior.

Results

HRQoL z scores were significantly lower after astrocytoma than those in the nontumor group and significantly lower again in the medulloblastoma group, both by self-report and by parent-report. In regression modeling, significant child-related predictors of poorer HRQoL z scores by self-report were poorer cognitive and emotional function (both z scores) and greater age (years) at enrollment (B = 0.038, 0.098, 0.136, respectively). By parent-report, poorer cognitive, emotional and motor or sensory function (z score) were predictive of lower subsequent HRQoL of the child (B = 0.043, 0.112, 0.019, respectively), while age at enrollment was not.

Conclusions

Early screening of cognitive and emotional function in this age group, which are potentially amenable to change, could identify those at risk of poor HRQoL and provide a rational basis for interventions to improve HRQoL.
cerebellar astrocytoma, children, medulloblastoma, outcome, quality of life
2054-2577
114-122
Bull, Kim S.
751f8b25-29ba-4d4f-96e2-6c339a83a47f
Liossi, Christina
fd401ad6-581a-4a31-a60b-f8671ffd3558
Culliford, David
25511573-74d3-422a-b0ee-dfe60f80df87
Peacock, Janet L.
1cb1242c-7606-4f8e-86d0-d3cd2ceff782
Kennedy, Colin R.
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93
Bull, Kim S.
751f8b25-29ba-4d4f-96e2-6c339a83a47f
Liossi, Christina
fd401ad6-581a-4a31-a60b-f8671ffd3558
Culliford, David
25511573-74d3-422a-b0ee-dfe60f80df87
Peacock, Janet L.
1cb1242c-7606-4f8e-86d0-d3cd2ceff782
Kennedy, Colin R.
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93

Bull, Kim S., Liossi, Christina, Culliford, David, Peacock, Janet L. and Kennedy, Colin R. (2014) Child-related characteristics predicting subsequent health-related quality of life in 8- to 14-year-old children with and without cerebellar tumors: a prospective longitudinal study. Neuro-Oncology Practice, 1 (3), 114-122. (doi:10.1093/nop/npu016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

We identified child-related determinants of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children aged 8–14 years who were treated for 2 common types of pediatric brain tumors.

Methods

Questionnaire measures of HRQoL and psychometric assessments were completed by 110 children on 3 occasions over 24 months. Of these 110, 72 were within 3 years of diagnosis of a cerebellar tumor (37 standard-risk medulloblastoma, 35 low-grade cerebellar astrocytoma), and 38 were in a nontumor group. HRQoL, executive function, health status, and behavioral difficulties were also assessed by parents and teachers as appropriate. Regression modeling was used to relate HRQoL z scores to age, sex, socioeconomic status, and 5 domains of functioning: Cognition, Emotion, Social, Motor and Sensory, and Behavior.

Results

HRQoL z scores were significantly lower after astrocytoma than those in the nontumor group and significantly lower again in the medulloblastoma group, both by self-report and by parent-report. In regression modeling, significant child-related predictors of poorer HRQoL z scores by self-report were poorer cognitive and emotional function (both z scores) and greater age (years) at enrollment (B = 0.038, 0.098, 0.136, respectively). By parent-report, poorer cognitive, emotional and motor or sensory function (z score) were predictive of lower subsequent HRQoL of the child (B = 0.043, 0.112, 0.019, respectively), while age at enrollment was not.

Conclusions

Early screening of cognitive and emotional function in this age group, which are potentially amenable to change, could identify those at risk of poor HRQoL and provide a rational basis for interventions to improve HRQoL.

Text
Bull et al NOP 2014.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 11 August 2014
Published date: September 2014
Keywords: cerebellar astrocytoma, children, medulloblastoma, outcome, quality of life
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372167
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372167
ISSN: 2054-2577
PURE UUID: 17a56c9e-11aa-4164-b303-cea229a9d922
ORCID for Kim S. Bull: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5541-4556
ORCID for Christina Liossi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0627-6377

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Date deposited: 03 Dec 2014 10:38
Last modified: 10 Sep 2019 00:49

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Contributors

Author: Kim S. Bull ORCID iD
Author: David Culliford
Author: Janet L. Peacock

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