The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

How can we exploit the brain's ability to repair itself?

How can we exploit the brain's ability to repair itself?
How can we exploit the brain's ability to repair itself?
The notion of our brain having a limited repertoire of cells to be used throughout our life has been refuted multiples times, showing systems by which new neurons are generated on demand, accounting for crucial aspects of brain function in a process known as neurogenesis. The potential of neurogenesis to replace lost neurons is enormous and has direct implications on how we understand the brain’s response to pathology. But replacing functional neurons is not trivial: an orchestrated sequence of steps is needed to ensure the timed generation of new cells, their migration to the sites of injury and their correct differentiation and integration into the pre-existing circuitry. However, there is evidence of this sequence being effective in replacing certain neuronal populations in brain disease. The perspective of understanding, manipulating and directing the brain’s self-repairing responses opens a vast avenue to explore novel therapeutic approaches to replace neuronal loss in neurodegenerative diseases.

1473-7175
1345-1348
Miller, Victoria
f51c08ea-4503-481a-bdfb-4558562c15d6
Gomez-Nicola, Diego
0680aa66-9dee-47cf-a8d3-e39c988f85b5
Miller, Victoria
f51c08ea-4503-481a-bdfb-4558562c15d6
Gomez-Nicola, Diego
0680aa66-9dee-47cf-a8d3-e39c988f85b5

Miller, Victoria and Gomez-Nicola, Diego (2014) How can we exploit the brain's ability to repair itself? Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, 14 (12), 1345-1348. (doi:10.1586/14737175.2014.985659). (PMID:25427149)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The notion of our brain having a limited repertoire of cells to be used throughout our life has been refuted multiples times, showing systems by which new neurons are generated on demand, accounting for crucial aspects of brain function in a process known as neurogenesis. The potential of neurogenesis to replace lost neurons is enormous and has direct implications on how we understand the brain’s response to pathology. But replacing functional neurons is not trivial: an orchestrated sequence of steps is needed to ensure the timed generation of new cells, their migration to the sites of injury and their correct differentiation and integration into the pre-existing circuitry. However, there is evidence of this sequence being effective in replacing certain neuronal populations in brain disease. The perspective of understanding, manipulating and directing the brain’s self-repairing responses opens a vast avenue to explore novel therapeutic approaches to replace neuronal loss in neurodegenerative diseases.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 27 November 2014
Organisations: Biomedicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372203
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372203
ISSN: 1473-7175
PURE UUID: 14effcd4-9203-44f8-a080-af9e4a726bd3
ORCID for Diego Gomez-Nicola: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5316-2682

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Dec 2014 11:11
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×