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Cognitive-behavioural therapy for patients with schizophrenia: a multicentre randomised controlled trial in Beijing, China

Cognitive-behavioural therapy for patients with schizophrenia: a multicentre randomised controlled trial in Beijing, China
Cognitive-behavioural therapy for patients with schizophrenia: a multicentre randomised controlled trial in Beijing, China
Meta-analyses support the efficacy of cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) for schizophrenia in western cultures. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of CBT and supportive therapy (ST) for patients with schizophrenia in China.

A multicentre randomized controlled, single-blinded, parallel-group trial enrolled a sample of 192 patients with schizophrenia. All patients were offered 15 sessions of either CBT or ST over 24 weeks and followed up for an additional 60 weeks. All measures used were standardized instruments with good reliability and validity. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was used to assess symptoms of schizophrenia. The Schedule for Assessing Insight (SAI) was used to assess patients’ insight and the Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP) was used to assess their social functioning.

Effect-size analysis showed that patients made rapid improvements in all symptoms, insight and social functioning as measured by the PANSS, SAI and PSP at 12 and 24 weeks and maintained these improvements over the course of the study to 84 weeks. Patients in the CBT group showed significantly greater and more durable improvement in PANSS total score (p = 0.045, between-group d = 0.48), positive symptoms (p = 0.018, between-group d = 0.42) and social functioning (p = 0.037, between-group d = 0.64), with significant differences emerging after completion of therapy.

Both CBT and ST combined with medication had benefits on psychopathology, insight and social functioning of patients with schizophrenia. CBT was significantly more effective than ST on overall, positive symptoms and social functioning of patients with schizophrenia in the long term.
0033-2917
1893-1905
Li, Zhan-Jiang
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Guo, Zhi-Hua
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Wang, Na
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Xu, Zi-Yan
201b4dd4-00d4-4b75-b39f-97bbce968275
Qu, Ying
7dab1197-e2cf-4827-929a-6721cec9b951
Wang, Xiang-Qun
f25a22b4-7762-4d41-98f3-2de0ebc6a5fb
Sun, Jing
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Yan, Li-Qiong
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Ng, Roger
e48af14f-7cc3-407b-aea9-18838ba29046
Turkington, Douglas
3e0aca69-c932-4fb6-9145-6e19c7310700
Kingdon, David
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Li, Zhan-Jiang
5920e898-620a-4a3d-a50f-e305c5f07d65
Guo, Zhi-Hua
c675db20-94fa-449d-bbd1-1006da63e150
Wang, Na
31aa3264-81d5-4fd9-a7ad-e9da5c590664
Xu, Zi-Yan
201b4dd4-00d4-4b75-b39f-97bbce968275
Qu, Ying
7dab1197-e2cf-4827-929a-6721cec9b951
Wang, Xiang-Qun
f25a22b4-7762-4d41-98f3-2de0ebc6a5fb
Sun, Jing
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Yan, Li-Qiong
24eac16a-0f1d-48f6-863f-38a6c9409767
Ng, Roger
e48af14f-7cc3-407b-aea9-18838ba29046
Turkington, Douglas
3e0aca69-c932-4fb6-9145-6e19c7310700
Kingdon, David
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b

Li, Zhan-Jiang, Guo, Zhi-Hua, Wang, Na, Xu, Zi-Yan, Qu, Ying, Wang, Xiang-Qun, Sun, Jing, Yan, Li-Qiong, Ng, Roger, Turkington, Douglas and Kingdon, David (2015) Cognitive-behavioural therapy for patients with schizophrenia: a multicentre randomised controlled trial in Beijing, China. Psychological Medicine, 45 (9), 1893-1905. (doi:10.1017/S0033291714002992). (PMID:25532460)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Meta-analyses support the efficacy of cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) for schizophrenia in western cultures. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of CBT and supportive therapy (ST) for patients with schizophrenia in China.

A multicentre randomized controlled, single-blinded, parallel-group trial enrolled a sample of 192 patients with schizophrenia. All patients were offered 15 sessions of either CBT or ST over 24 weeks and followed up for an additional 60 weeks. All measures used were standardized instruments with good reliability and validity. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was used to assess symptoms of schizophrenia. The Schedule for Assessing Insight (SAI) was used to assess patients’ insight and the Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP) was used to assess their social functioning.

Effect-size analysis showed that patients made rapid improvements in all symptoms, insight and social functioning as measured by the PANSS, SAI and PSP at 12 and 24 weeks and maintained these improvements over the course of the study to 84 weeks. Patients in the CBT group showed significantly greater and more durable improvement in PANSS total score (p = 0.045, between-group d = 0.48), positive symptoms (p = 0.018, between-group d = 0.42) and social functioning (p = 0.037, between-group d = 0.64), with significant differences emerging after completion of therapy.

Both CBT and ST combined with medication had benefits on psychopathology, insight and social functioning of patients with schizophrenia. CBT was significantly more effective than ST on overall, positive symptoms and social functioning of patients with schizophrenia in the long term.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 23 December 2014
Published date: July 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 372249
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372249
ISSN: 0033-2917
PURE UUID: a86fe42b-fc7f-4a6a-b8e1-5e1abddd90e5

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Date deposited: 04 Dec 2014 11:11
Last modified: 18 Nov 2019 20:28

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Contributors

Author: Zhan-Jiang Li
Author: Zhi-Hua Guo
Author: Na Wang
Author: Zi-Yan Xu
Author: Ying Qu
Author: Xiang-Qun Wang
Author: Jing Sun
Author: Li-Qiong Yan
Author: Roger Ng
Author: Douglas Turkington
Author: David Kingdon

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