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Alcohol health literacy in young adults with type 1 diabetes and impact on diabetes management

Alcohol health literacy in young adults with type 1 diabetes and impact on diabetes management
Alcohol health literacy in young adults with type 1 diabetes and impact on diabetes management
Aims: to investigate the knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content of commonly consumed alcoholic drinks among young adults with Type 1 diabetes and to explore alcohol consumption while identifying diabetes self-management strategies used to minimize alcohol-associated risk.

Method: we conducted an open-access, multiple-choice web survey to investigate knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content of typical alcoholic drinks using images. Respondents to the survey also recorded their current alcohol consumption and diabetes self-management strategies when drinking.

Results: total of 547 people aged 18-30 years responded to the survey (341 women; 192 men; mean (sd) age 24.5 (3.7) years), of whom 365 (66.7%) drank alcohol. In all, 84 (32.9%) women and 31 (22.6%) men scored higher than the cut-off score for increased-risk drinking. Knowledge accuracy of alcohol units was poor: only 7.3% (n = 40) correctly identified the alcohol content of six or more out of 10 drinks. Knowledge of carbohydrate content was also poor: no respondent correctly identified the carbohydrate content of six or more out of 10 drinks. Various and inconsistent strategies to minimize alcohol-associated risk were reported.

Conclusions: alcohol consumption was common among the survey respondents, but knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content was poor. Greater alcohol-related health literacy is required to minimize alcohol-associated risk. Further research should help develop effective strategies to improve health literacy and support safe drinking for young adults with Type 1 diabetes
0742-3071
1625-1630
Barnard, K.D.
1ade2840-48a4-4bb3-b564-0a058df8297f
Dyson, P.
2c883eae-b5b0-4ff0-8d31-e846b21c65ae
Sinclair, J.M.A.
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c
Lawton, J.
a698daa4-141e-4480-83e4-1193da86ed26
Anthony, D.
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Cranston, M.
6a641223-dda3-49ff-8996-7d65a75f0b58
Holt, RI
57fe0446-ef4b-462b-8701-1462910460a4
Barnard, K.D.
1ade2840-48a4-4bb3-b564-0a058df8297f
Dyson, P.
2c883eae-b5b0-4ff0-8d31-e846b21c65ae
Sinclair, J.M.A.
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c
Lawton, J.
a698daa4-141e-4480-83e4-1193da86ed26
Anthony, D.
e5e33045-5b7e-43f2-87c3-203e38194af1
Cranston, M.
6a641223-dda3-49ff-8996-7d65a75f0b58
Holt, RI
57fe0446-ef4b-462b-8701-1462910460a4

Barnard, K.D., Dyson, P., Sinclair, J.M.A., Lawton, J., Anthony, D., Cranston, M. and Holt, RI (2014) Alcohol health literacy in young adults with type 1 diabetes and impact on diabetes management. Diabetic Medicine, 31 (12), 1625-1630. (doi:10.1111/dme.12491). (PMID:24823681)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aims: to investigate the knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content of commonly consumed alcoholic drinks among young adults with Type 1 diabetes and to explore alcohol consumption while identifying diabetes self-management strategies used to minimize alcohol-associated risk.

Method: we conducted an open-access, multiple-choice web survey to investigate knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content of typical alcoholic drinks using images. Respondents to the survey also recorded their current alcohol consumption and diabetes self-management strategies when drinking.

Results: total of 547 people aged 18-30 years responded to the survey (341 women; 192 men; mean (sd) age 24.5 (3.7) years), of whom 365 (66.7%) drank alcohol. In all, 84 (32.9%) women and 31 (22.6%) men scored higher than the cut-off score for increased-risk drinking. Knowledge accuracy of alcohol units was poor: only 7.3% (n = 40) correctly identified the alcohol content of six or more out of 10 drinks. Knowledge of carbohydrate content was also poor: no respondent correctly identified the carbohydrate content of six or more out of 10 drinks. Various and inconsistent strategies to minimize alcohol-associated risk were reported.

Conclusions: alcohol consumption was common among the survey respondents, but knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content was poor. Greater alcohol-related health literacy is required to minimize alcohol-associated risk. Further research should help develop effective strategies to improve health literacy and support safe drinking for young adults with Type 1 diabetes

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e-pub ahead of print date: 7 June 2014
Published date: 7 June 2014
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 372258
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372258
ISSN: 0742-3071
PURE UUID: bb24e433-a6e9-4fce-b386-7827aa3051c8
ORCID for J.M.A. Sinclair: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1905-2025

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Date deposited: 08 Dec 2014 09:31
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:56

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Contributors

Author: K.D. Barnard
Author: P. Dyson
Author: J.M.A. Sinclair ORCID iD
Author: J. Lawton
Author: D. Anthony
Author: M. Cranston
Author: RI Holt

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