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The role of nanoscale toughening mechanisms in osteoporosis

The role of nanoscale toughening mechanisms in osteoporosis
The role of nanoscale toughening mechanisms in osteoporosis
Strength is the most widely reported parameter with regards to bone failure. However, bone contains pre-existing damage and stress concentration sites, perhaps making measures of fracture toughness more indicative of the resistance of the tissue to withstand fracture. Several toughening mechanisms have been identified in bone, prominently, at the microscale. More recently, nanoscale toughness mechanisms, such as sacrificial-bonds and hidden-length or dilatational band formation, mediated by noncollagenous proteins, have been reported. Absence of specific noncollagenous proteins results in lowered fracture toughness in animal models. Further, roles of several other, putative influencing, factors such as closely bound water, collagen cross-linking and citrate bonds in bone mineral have also been proposed. Yet, it is still not clear if and which mechanisms are hallmarks of osteoporosis disease and how they influence fracture risk. Further insights on the workings of such influencing factors are of high importance for developing complementary diagnostics and therapeutics strategies
Cortical bone tissue, Fracture toughness, Osteoporosis, Toughening mechanisms, Ultrastructure
351-356
Thurner, Philipp J.
ab711ddd-784e-48de-aaad-f56aec40f84f
Katsamenis, Orestis L.
8553e7c3-d860-4b7a-a883-abf6c0c4b438
Thurner, Philipp J.
ab711ddd-784e-48de-aaad-f56aec40f84f
Katsamenis, Orestis L.
8553e7c3-d860-4b7a-a883-abf6c0c4b438

Thurner, Philipp J. and Katsamenis, Orestis L. (2014) The role of nanoscale toughening mechanisms in osteoporosis. Current Osteoporosis Reports, 12 (3), 351-356. (doi:10.1007/s11914-014-0217-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Strength is the most widely reported parameter with regards to bone failure. However, bone contains pre-existing damage and stress concentration sites, perhaps making measures of fracture toughness more indicative of the resistance of the tissue to withstand fracture. Several toughening mechanisms have been identified in bone, prominently, at the microscale. More recently, nanoscale toughness mechanisms, such as sacrificial-bonds and hidden-length or dilatational band formation, mediated by noncollagenous proteins, have been reported. Absence of specific noncollagenous proteins results in lowered fracture toughness in animal models. Further, roles of several other, putative influencing, factors such as closely bound water, collagen cross-linking and citrate bonds in bone mineral have also been proposed. Yet, it is still not clear if and which mechanisms are hallmarks of osteoporosis disease and how they influence fracture risk. Further insights on the workings of such influencing factors are of high importance for developing complementary diagnostics and therapeutics strategies

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 27 June 2014
Published date: 2014
Keywords: Cortical bone tissue, Fracture toughness, Osteoporosis, Toughening mechanisms, Ultrastructure
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp, Bioengineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372315
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372315
PURE UUID: 435fde9c-9d24-4622-9800-0b2de99868ed
ORCID for Philipp J. Thurner: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7588-9041
ORCID for Orestis L. Katsamenis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4367-4147

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jul 2015 12:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:16

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