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Testing the long-term stability of marine isoscapes in shelf seas using jellyfish tissues

Testing the long-term stability of marine isoscapes in shelf seas using jellyfish tissues
Testing the long-term stability of marine isoscapes in shelf seas using jellyfish tissues
Maps of the spatial distribution of stable isotope ratios across wide geographic areas (isoscapes) are increasingly used to study mechanisms of nutrient flux, movements of animals, and to improve trophic information derived from stable isotope analyses. Isoscapes are usually constructed from reference samples collected from known geographic positions, a time consuming and costly process. In this study, we test the temporal stability of isoscapes of carbon and nitrogen isotopes across the North Sea over a ten-year period. Using jellyfish tissues as reference organisms, we show that hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes controlling the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotope values, and thus that the underlying isoscapes, are temporally stable. Remarkably, broad geographic variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope distributions across the North Sea are consistent with previously published variations seen in archaeological cod bones from the ninth to seventeenth centuries, despite dramatic changes in land use in the past 1,000 years. Stable isotope-based studies of trophic interactions or movements in animals with lifespans of a year or more in shelf ecosystems can consequently be referenced to previously published isoscape models, and do not require construction of temporally explicit isotope baseline corrections. Scyphomedusan jellyfish are excellent reference organisms for ecological stable isotope analyses in pelagic ecosystems, due to their widespread distributions, well-defined life histories, and fast tissue growth.
Stable isotope, Movement, Food web, Trophic, North Sea
0168-2563
441-454
MacKenzie, K.M.
512f2b73-f8e4-4ab4-8d91-16c0a2084120
Longmore, C.
5e712f1d-75d2-4fed-8d9a-3835d314394e
Preece, C.
3ac229d4-e159-4e26-bb8f-37255dc32a82
Lucas, C.H.
521743e3-b250-4c6b-b084-780af697d6bf
Trueman, C.N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
MacKenzie, K.M.
512f2b73-f8e4-4ab4-8d91-16c0a2084120
Longmore, C.
5e712f1d-75d2-4fed-8d9a-3835d314394e
Preece, C.
3ac229d4-e159-4e26-bb8f-37255dc32a82
Lucas, C.H.
521743e3-b250-4c6b-b084-780af697d6bf
Trueman, C.N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205

MacKenzie, K.M., Longmore, C., Preece, C., Lucas, C.H. and Trueman, C.N. (2014) Testing the long-term stability of marine isoscapes in shelf seas using jellyfish tissues. Biogeochemistry, 121 (2), 441-454. (doi:10.1007/s10533-014-0011-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Maps of the spatial distribution of stable isotope ratios across wide geographic areas (isoscapes) are increasingly used to study mechanisms of nutrient flux, movements of animals, and to improve trophic information derived from stable isotope analyses. Isoscapes are usually constructed from reference samples collected from known geographic positions, a time consuming and costly process. In this study, we test the temporal stability of isoscapes of carbon and nitrogen isotopes across the North Sea over a ten-year period. Using jellyfish tissues as reference organisms, we show that hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes controlling the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotope values, and thus that the underlying isoscapes, are temporally stable. Remarkably, broad geographic variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope distributions across the North Sea are consistent with previously published variations seen in archaeological cod bones from the ninth to seventeenth centuries, despite dramatic changes in land use in the past 1,000 years. Stable isotope-based studies of trophic interactions or movements in animals with lifespans of a year or more in shelf ecosystems can consequently be referenced to previously published isoscape models, and do not require construction of temporally explicit isotope baseline corrections. Scyphomedusan jellyfish are excellent reference organisms for ecological stable isotope analyses in pelagic ecosystems, due to their widespread distributions, well-defined life histories, and fast tissue growth.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2014
Keywords: Stable isotope, Movement, Food web, Trophic, North Sea
Organisations: Geochemistry, Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372431
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372431
ISSN: 0168-2563
PURE UUID: 6d19c2b6-4d36-4cda-a16f-59f60a7d71be
ORCID for C.H. Lucas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5929-7481

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Dec 2014 13:53
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:55

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