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Recycling glass fibre-reinforced plastics in the automotive sector

Recycling glass fibre-reinforced plastics in the automotive sector
Recycling glass fibre-reinforced plastics in the automotive sector
The automotive sector is facing the challenge to become more resource-efficient in the manufacture of cars and their
components. One approach is to increase the share of recycled materials. This paper presents the results of a case study for the automotive sector of the EU-funded Zerowin project. A safety-relevant component of the braking
system was selected for manufacture using a mechanically recycled composite plastic material (polyethylene
terephthalate reinforced with short glass fibres). The case study demonstrated the interdependencies between material and component specification, component design, material properties and the production process: using recycled glass-fibre-reinforced plastics for a safety-relevant component is not just an issue of input substitution, it is an interplay of technological (product development, production process modification, recycling process), organisational (security of supply, network infrastructure) and economic (material cost savings versus adjustment costs, planning horizons) factors resulting from the input substitution of primary material and changes of material properties. An industrial network was established and the case study’s findings were transferred to serial mass production. Industrial networks are seen as an appropriate tool for securing the supply and quality of recyclates from traceable sources.
recycling & reuse of materials, resins & plastics, business
1747-6526
169-177
Regenfelder, M.
a5662054-cdb6-40af-9645-973b51dcff34
Faller, J.
66b6bec2-7563-49ba-a0ad-048e540ad450
Dully, S.
45f99d85-14ce-4e14-b108-5c39cdca6b6e
Perthes, H.
250cd36b-434b-4309-9ef8-ca1d6c20ca0e
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
den Boer, E.
d59b4705-e941-494b-a4ce-5e16140bcccc
Obersteiner, G.
ee1ed70d-0ad5-43a4-944c-182cbae1dacb
Scherhaufer, S.
978f3d51-5724-442b-9a9d-10e59e62b154
Regenfelder, M.
a5662054-cdb6-40af-9645-973b51dcff34
Faller, J.
66b6bec2-7563-49ba-a0ad-048e540ad450
Dully, S.
45f99d85-14ce-4e14-b108-5c39cdca6b6e
Perthes, H.
250cd36b-434b-4309-9ef8-ca1d6c20ca0e
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
den Boer, E.
d59b4705-e941-494b-a4ce-5e16140bcccc
Obersteiner, G.
ee1ed70d-0ad5-43a4-944c-182cbae1dacb
Scherhaufer, S.
978f3d51-5724-442b-9a9d-10e59e62b154

Regenfelder, M., Faller, J., Dully, S., Perthes, H., Williams, I.D., den Boer, E., Obersteiner, G. and Scherhaufer, S. (2014) Recycling glass fibre-reinforced plastics in the automotive sector. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Waste and Resource Management, 167 (4), 169-177. (doi:10.1680/warm.13.00028).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The automotive sector is facing the challenge to become more resource-efficient in the manufacture of cars and their
components. One approach is to increase the share of recycled materials. This paper presents the results of a case study for the automotive sector of the EU-funded Zerowin project. A safety-relevant component of the braking
system was selected for manufacture using a mechanically recycled composite plastic material (polyethylene
terephthalate reinforced with short glass fibres). The case study demonstrated the interdependencies between material and component specification, component design, material properties and the production process: using recycled glass-fibre-reinforced plastics for a safety-relevant component is not just an issue of input substitution, it is an interplay of technological (product development, production process modification, recycling process), organisational (security of supply, network infrastructure) and economic (material cost savings versus adjustment costs, planning horizons) factors resulting from the input substitution of primary material and changes of material properties. An industrial network was established and the case study’s findings were transferred to serial mass production. Industrial networks are seen as an appropriate tool for securing the supply and quality of recyclates from traceable sources.

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More information

Published date: May 2014
Keywords: recycling & reuse of materials, resins & plastics, business
Organisations: Centre for Environmental Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372513
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372513
ISSN: 1747-6526
PURE UUID: d840f71c-6f61-453e-b2f6-ae412cae0f9d
ORCID for I.D. Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Dec 2014 16:49
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:56

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