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Heidegger, authenticity and the self: themes from Division Two of Being and Time

Heidegger, authenticity and the self: themes from Division Two of Being and Time
Heidegger, authenticity and the self: themes from Division Two of Being and Time
Though Heidegger’s Being and Time is often cited as one of the most important philosophical works of the last hundred years, its Division Two has received relatively little attention. This collection corrects that, examining some of the central themes of Division Two and their wide-ranging and challenging implications.

An international team of leading philosophers explore the crucial notions that articulate Heidegger’s concept of authenticity, including death, anxiety, conscience, guilt, resolution and temporality. In doing so, they clarify the bearing of Division Two’s reflections on our understanding of intentionality, normativity, responsibility, autonomy and selfhood. These discussions raise important questions about how we may need to rethink the morals of Division One of Being and Time, the broader project to which that book was devoted, the shaping influence of figures such as Aristotle and Kierkegaard, as well as Heidegger’s relationship with his contemporaries and successors.

Contributors: William Blattner, Clare Carlisle, Taylor Carman, Steven Galt Crowell, Daniel O. Dahlstrom, Sophia Dandelet, Hubert Dreyfus, Charles Guignon, Jeffrey Haynes, Stephan Käufer, Denis McManus, Stephen Mulhall, George Pattison, Peter Poellner, Katherine Withy, Mark A. Wrathall.
978-0-415-67270-2
Routledge
McManus, Denis
95bb0718-d3fa-4982-9cde-05ac00b5bb24
McManus, Denis
95bb0718-d3fa-4982-9cde-05ac00b5bb24

McManus, Denis (ed.) (2015) Heidegger, authenticity and the self: themes from Division Two of Being and Time , Abingdon, GB. Routledge, 284pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

Though Heidegger’s Being and Time is often cited as one of the most important philosophical works of the last hundred years, its Division Two has received relatively little attention. This collection corrects that, examining some of the central themes of Division Two and their wide-ranging and challenging implications.

An international team of leading philosophers explore the crucial notions that articulate Heidegger’s concept of authenticity, including death, anxiety, conscience, guilt, resolution and temporality. In doing so, they clarify the bearing of Division Two’s reflections on our understanding of intentionality, normativity, responsibility, autonomy and selfhood. These discussions raise important questions about how we may need to rethink the morals of Division One of Being and Time, the broader project to which that book was devoted, the shaping influence of figures such as Aristotle and Kierkegaard, as well as Heidegger’s relationship with his contemporaries and successors.

Contributors: William Blattner, Clare Carlisle, Taylor Carman, Steven Galt Crowell, Daniel O. Dahlstrom, Sophia Dandelet, Hubert Dreyfus, Charles Guignon, Jeffrey Haynes, Stephan Käufer, Denis McManus, Stephen Mulhall, George Pattison, Peter Poellner, Katherine Withy, Mark A. Wrathall.

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More information

Published date: 2015
Organisations: Philosophy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372631
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372631
ISBN: 978-0-415-67270-2
PURE UUID: 70014c2f-f363-41b6-956b-d66e8a51d66e

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Date deposited: 18 Dec 2014 16:36
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:39

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