The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Eternal 5D storage in quartz glass

Eternal 5D storage in quartz glass
Eternal 5D storage in quartz glass
Femtosecond laser writing in transparent materials has attracted considerable interest due to new science and a wide range of applications from laser surgery, 30 integrated optics and optofluidics to optical data storage. A decade ago it has been discovered that under certain irradiation conditions self-organized subwavelength structures with record small features of 20 nm, can be created in the volume of fused quartz, which is renowned for its high chemical stability. On the macroscopic scale the self-assembled nanostructure behaves as a uniaxial optical crystal with negative birefringence. The optical anisotropy, which results from the alignment of nano-platelets, referred to as form birefringence, is of the same order of magnitude as positive birefringence in crystalline quartz. The two independent parameters describing birefringence, the slow axis orientation (4th dimension) and the strength of retardance (5th dimension), are explored for the optical encoding of information in addition to three spatial coordinates. The slow axis orientation and the retardance are independently manipulated by the polarization and intensity of the femtosecond laser beam. The storage allows unprecedented parameters including hundreds of terabytes per disc data capacity and thermal stability up to 1000°. Even at elevated temperatures of 160 °C, the extrapolated decay time of nanogratings is comparable with the age of the Universe - 13.8 billion years. The demonstrated recording of the first digital document, which will survive the human race, is a vital step towards an eternal archive.
Kazansky, P.G.
a5d123ec-8ea8-408c-8963-4a6d921fd76c
Kazansky, P.G.
a5d123ec-8ea8-408c-8963-4a6d921fd76c

Kazansky, P.G. (2014) Eternal 5D storage in quartz glass. Human Document Project Symposium, Netherlands. 27 - 28 Nov 2014.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Femtosecond laser writing in transparent materials has attracted considerable interest due to new science and a wide range of applications from laser surgery, 30 integrated optics and optofluidics to optical data storage. A decade ago it has been discovered that under certain irradiation conditions self-organized subwavelength structures with record small features of 20 nm, can be created in the volume of fused quartz, which is renowned for its high chemical stability. On the macroscopic scale the self-assembled nanostructure behaves as a uniaxial optical crystal with negative birefringence. The optical anisotropy, which results from the alignment of nano-platelets, referred to as form birefringence, is of the same order of magnitude as positive birefringence in crystalline quartz. The two independent parameters describing birefringence, the slow axis orientation (4th dimension) and the strength of retardance (5th dimension), are explored for the optical encoding of information in addition to three spatial coordinates. The slow axis orientation and the retardance are independently manipulated by the polarization and intensity of the femtosecond laser beam. The storage allows unprecedented parameters including hundreds of terabytes per disc data capacity and thermal stability up to 1000°. Even at elevated temperatures of 160 °C, the extrapolated decay time of nanogratings is comparable with the age of the Universe - 13.8 billion years. The demonstrated recording of the first digital document, which will survive the human race, is a vital step towards an eternal archive.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: November 2014
Venue - Dates: Human Document Project Symposium, Netherlands, 2014-11-27 - 2014-11-28
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372655
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372655
PURE UUID: fb6b19e0-5501-4b62-a740-58b424fd8684

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Dec 2014 14:59
Last modified: 29 Nov 2018 17:32

Export record

Contributors

Author: P.G. Kazansky

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×