The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Boxed up and locked up, safe and tight! Making the case for unattended electronic locker bank logistics for an innovative solution to NHS hospital supplies (UK)

Boxed up and locked up, safe and tight! Making the case for unattended electronic locker bank logistics for an innovative solution to NHS hospital supplies (UK)
Boxed up and locked up, safe and tight! Making the case for unattended electronic locker bank logistics for an innovative solution to NHS hospital supplies (UK)
The lack of separation between urgent and non-urgent medical goods encourages sub-optimal vehicle fleet operations owing to the time critical nature of urgent items. An unattended electronic locker bank, to which individual urgent items can be delivered thereby separating urgent and non-urgent supply, was proposed for the Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, UK. This concept was quantified using 'basic' and 'intuitive' hill climbing optimisation models; and qualitatively using staff interviews and expert reviews. Results indicated that a locker bank with a fixed height (1.7 m) and depth (0.8 m) required a length of 4 m (basic model) and 3.63 m (intuitive model), to accommodate 100% of urgent consignments for a typical week. Staff interviews indicated the wider benefits such as staff personal deliveries.
1753-8432
104-125
Bailey, Gavin
b5be6ab7-45fa-4176-a9ea-84bef64ab631
Cherrett, Tom
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286
Breen, Liz
516211de-dbb6-4381-be29-cdfb0652a58d
Long, Robert
b66f75ce-4c85-46ff-bd32-d63a8356a724
Bailey, Gavin
b5be6ab7-45fa-4176-a9ea-84bef64ab631
Cherrett, Tom
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286
Breen, Liz
516211de-dbb6-4381-be29-cdfb0652a58d
Long, Robert
b66f75ce-4c85-46ff-bd32-d63a8356a724

Bailey, Gavin, Cherrett, Tom, Waterson, Ben, Breen, Liz and Long, Robert (2015) Boxed up and locked up, safe and tight! Making the case for unattended electronic locker bank logistics for an innovative solution to NHS hospital supplies (UK). International Journal of Procurement Management, 8 (1/2), 104-125. (doi:10.1504/IJPM.2015.066290).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The lack of separation between urgent and non-urgent medical goods encourages sub-optimal vehicle fleet operations owing to the time critical nature of urgent items. An unattended electronic locker bank, to which individual urgent items can be delivered thereby separating urgent and non-urgent supply, was proposed for the Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, UK. This concept was quantified using 'basic' and 'intuitive' hill climbing optimisation models; and qualitatively using staff interviews and expert reviews. Results indicated that a locker bank with a fixed height (1.7 m) and depth (0.8 m) required a length of 4 m (basic model) and 3.63 m (intuitive model), to accommodate 100% of urgent consignments for a typical week. Staff interviews indicated the wider benefits such as staff personal deliveries.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 11 December 2014
Published date: January 2015
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372723
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372723
ISSN: 1753-8432
PURE UUID: 3bd18ec0-362b-4b17-9a4a-ac031f533ce0
ORCID for Ben Waterson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-7119

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Dec 2014 17:10
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:55

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Gavin Bailey
Author: Tom Cherrett
Author: Ben Waterson ORCID iD
Author: Liz Breen
Author: Robert Long

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×