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Is there a rhythm of the rain? An analysis of weather in popular music

Is there a rhythm of the rain? An analysis of weather in popular music
Is there a rhythm of the rain? An analysis of weather in popular music
Weather is frequently used in music to frame events and emotions, yet quantitative analyses are rare. From a collated base set of 759 weather-related songs, 419 were analysed based on listings from a karaoke database. This article analyses the 20 weather types described, frequency of occurrence, genre, keys, mimicry, lyrics and songwriters. Vocals were the principal means of communicating weather: sunshine was the most common, followed by rain, with weather depictions linked to the emotions of the song. Bob Dylan, John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote the most weather-related songs, partly following their experiences at the time of writing.
198-204
Brown, S.
dd3c5852-78cc-435a-9846-4f3f540f2840
Aplin, K.L.
fdfb8bdb-5e3c-4f43-8df3-1505fd6f7746
Jenkins, K.
573a5d75-7c89-49d9-8eb7-3d754dc758e3
Mander, S.
63c49bb1-01ed-40a9-ae44-5d96eb06fb41
Walsh, C.
000b0eb1-ba84-44ad-a8ee-8e0f1ea87397
Williams, P.
f9438e1e-9cc3-4dfb-9246-a2cc2405182d
Brown, S.
dd3c5852-78cc-435a-9846-4f3f540f2840
Aplin, K.L.
fdfb8bdb-5e3c-4f43-8df3-1505fd6f7746
Jenkins, K.
573a5d75-7c89-49d9-8eb7-3d754dc758e3
Mander, S.
63c49bb1-01ed-40a9-ae44-5d96eb06fb41
Walsh, C.
000b0eb1-ba84-44ad-a8ee-8e0f1ea87397
Williams, P.
f9438e1e-9cc3-4dfb-9246-a2cc2405182d

Brown, S., Aplin, K.L., Jenkins, K., Mander, S., Walsh, C. and Williams, P. (2015) Is there a rhythm of the rain? An analysis of weather in popular music. Weather, 70 (7), 198-204. (doi:10.1002/wea.2464).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Weather is frequently used in music to frame events and emotions, yet quantitative analyses are rare. From a collated base set of 759 weather-related songs, 419 were analysed based on listings from a karaoke database. This article analyses the 20 weather types described, frequency of occurrence, genre, keys, mimicry, lyrics and songwriters. Vocals were the principal means of communicating weather: sunshine was the most common, followed by rain, with weather depictions linked to the emotions of the song. Bob Dylan, John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote the most weather-related songs, partly following their experiences at the time of writing.

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Accepted/In Press date: December 2014
Published date: 7 July 2015
Related URLs:
Organisations: Energy & Climate Change Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372800
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372800
PURE UUID: e8d461cf-d6c8-4a25-87db-ee0e6f32b8f9
ORCID for S. Brown: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1185-1962

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Dec 2014 14:44
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:36

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Contributors

Author: S. Brown ORCID iD
Author: K.L. Aplin
Author: K. Jenkins
Author: S. Mander
Author: C. Walsh
Author: P. Williams

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