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Advanced fiber tracking in early acquired brain injury causing cerebral palsy

Advanced fiber tracking in early acquired brain injury causing cerebral palsy
Advanced fiber tracking in early acquired brain injury causing cerebral palsy
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and fiber tractography can be used to investigate alterations in white matter tracts in patients with early acquired brain lesions and cerebral palsy. Most existing studies have used diffusion tensor tractography, which is limited in areas of complex fiber structures or pathologic processes. We explored a combined normalization and probabilistic fiber-tracking method for more realistic fiber tractography in this patient group.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 17 children with unilateral cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing controls. DWI data were collected at 1.5T (45 directions, b=1000 s/mm2). Regions of interest were defined on a study-specific fractional anisotropy template and mapped onto subjects for fiber tracking. Probabilistic fiber tracking of the corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex was performed by using constrained spherical deconvolution. Tracts were qualitatively assessed, and DTI parameters were extracted close to and distant from lesions and compared between groups.

RESULTS: The corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex were realistically reconstructed in both groups. Structural changes to tracts were seen in the cerebral palsy group and included splits, dislocations, compaction of the tracts, or failure to delineate the tract and were associated with underlying pathology seen on conventional MR imaging. Comparisons of DTI parameters indicated primary and secondary neurodegeneration along the corticospinal tract. Corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex showed dissimilarities in both structural changes and DTI parameters.

CONCLUSIONS: Our proposed method offers a sensitive means to explore alterations in WM tracts to further understand pathophysiologic changes following early acquired brain injury.
0195-6108
1-7
Lennartsson, F.
5ae708dc-a5b6-4dfa-abe7-1f08b1918dd0
Holmström, L.
f5361cfc-da74-4c89-be0b-44f0b5fe2e3f
Eliasson, A.-C.
61644c40-5d42-4fe6-89c1-6f1a73b943cb
Flodmark, O.
4a403135-f5f1-4656-802c-333e8df44742
Forssberg, H.
cc4374e9-ed87-436a-9872-8127e50add00
Tournier, J.-D.
6e26fa5b-7a70-43a9-9810-f0bdcd576ade
Lennartsson, F.
5ae708dc-a5b6-4dfa-abe7-1f08b1918dd0
Holmström, L.
f5361cfc-da74-4c89-be0b-44f0b5fe2e3f
Eliasson, A.-C.
61644c40-5d42-4fe6-89c1-6f1a73b943cb
Flodmark, O.
4a403135-f5f1-4656-802c-333e8df44742
Forssberg, H.
cc4374e9-ed87-436a-9872-8127e50add00
Tournier, J.-D.
6e26fa5b-7a70-43a9-9810-f0bdcd576ade

Lennartsson, F., Holmström, L., Eliasson, A.-C., Flodmark, O., Forssberg, H. and Tournier, J.-D. (2014) Advanced fiber tracking in early acquired brain injury causing cerebral palsy. American Journal of Neuroradiology, 1-7. (doi:10.3174/ajnr.A4072). (PMID:25169928)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and fiber tractography can be used to investigate alterations in white matter tracts in patients with early acquired brain lesions and cerebral palsy. Most existing studies have used diffusion tensor tractography, which is limited in areas of complex fiber structures or pathologic processes. We explored a combined normalization and probabilistic fiber-tracking method for more realistic fiber tractography in this patient group.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 17 children with unilateral cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing controls. DWI data were collected at 1.5T (45 directions, b=1000 s/mm2). Regions of interest were defined on a study-specific fractional anisotropy template and mapped onto subjects for fiber tracking. Probabilistic fiber tracking of the corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex was performed by using constrained spherical deconvolution. Tracts were qualitatively assessed, and DTI parameters were extracted close to and distant from lesions and compared between groups.

RESULTS: The corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex were realistically reconstructed in both groups. Structural changes to tracts were seen in the cerebral palsy group and included splits, dislocations, compaction of the tracts, or failure to delineate the tract and were associated with underlying pathology seen on conventional MR imaging. Comparisons of DTI parameters indicated primary and secondary neurodegeneration along the corticospinal tract. Corticospinal tract and thalamic projections to the somatosensory cortex showed dissimilarities in both structural changes and DTI parameters.

CONCLUSIONS: Our proposed method offers a sensitive means to explore alterations in WM tracts to further understand pathophysiologic changes following early acquired brain injury.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 28 August 2014
Published date: 28 August 2014
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372876
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372876
ISSN: 0195-6108
PURE UUID: 068b6c4b-533f-4f80-8259-d0b222fa8e22

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Date deposited: 24 Dec 2014 14:17
Last modified: 29 Aug 2017 16:31

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Contributors

Author: F. Lennartsson
Author: L. Holmström
Author: A.-C. Eliasson
Author: O. Flodmark
Author: H. Forssberg
Author: J.-D. Tournier

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