The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Growth, head growth, and neurocognitive outcome in children born very preterm: methodological aspects and selected results

Growth, head growth, and neurocognitive outcome in children born very preterm: methodological aspects and selected results
Growth, head growth, and neurocognitive outcome in children born very preterm: methodological aspects and selected results
In light of the growing number of surviving children born very preterm, there is an increasing focus on their long-term outcomes in terms of growth, metabolic status, and neurocognitive development. Therefore, it is of importance to follow such children from birth onwards with the aim of identifying the causes of atypical development, developing preventative measures, and improving outcomes. Since such long-term follow-up needs to be conducted with the least possible burden, clinical investigations such as anthropometry and neurocognitive tests, if conducted rigorously, will continue to have a predominant role. The aim of this review is to discuss the complexity of longitudinal anthropometry in children born very preterm and to provide an overview of the main studies that have examined associations between growth, in particular head growth, and neurocognitive outcomes at around school age.
0012-1622
23-28
Ranke, Michael B.
2e4d27a3-1c99-47a0-b390-81f2284bdbbd
Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg
aec979ce-1396-4720-8c09-962bee930fcd
Vollmer, Brigitte
044f8b55-ba36-4fb2-8e7e-756ab77653ba
Ranke, Michael B.
2e4d27a3-1c99-47a0-b390-81f2284bdbbd
Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg
aec979ce-1396-4720-8c09-962bee930fcd
Vollmer, Brigitte
044f8b55-ba36-4fb2-8e7e-756ab77653ba

Ranke, Michael B., Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg and Vollmer, Brigitte (2015) Growth, head growth, and neurocognitive outcome in children born very preterm: methodological aspects and selected results. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology., 57 (1), 23-28. (doi:10.1111/dmcn.12582). (PMID:25251724)

Record type: Article

Abstract

In light of the growing number of surviving children born very preterm, there is an increasing focus on their long-term outcomes in terms of growth, metabolic status, and neurocognitive development. Therefore, it is of importance to follow such children from birth onwards with the aim of identifying the causes of atypical development, developing preventative measures, and improving outcomes. Since such long-term follow-up needs to be conducted with the least possible burden, clinical investigations such as anthropometry and neurocognitive tests, if conducted rigorously, will continue to have a predominant role. The aim of this review is to discuss the complexity of longitudinal anthropometry in children born very preterm and to provide an overview of the main studies that have examined associations between growth, in particular head growth, and neurocognitive outcomes at around school age.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 23 September 2014
Published date: January 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372877
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372877
ISSN: 0012-1622
PURE UUID: 292c51be-67ff-4d29-9a08-bfe66f0d0e67
ORCID for Brigitte Vollmer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4088-5336

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Dec 2014 14:21
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:46

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×