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Changes in theta rhythm due to meditation in patients with schizophrenia: on-going research

Changes in theta rhythm due to meditation in patients with schizophrenia: on-going research
Changes in theta rhythm due to meditation in patients with schizophrenia: on-going research
Objective: Studies suggest that theta activity can be modified by meditation techniques in healthy adults. Aftanas and Golocheikine (2001) report that during meditation, EEG patterns are characterised by increased theta power over anterior midline electrodes of both general theta and frontal midline theta processes (brainwave patterns). We propose a study to see whether meditation can modify theta activity in patients with schizophrenia (who already have impaired low frequency oscillatory activity in the theta and delta frequency bands) when compared to control participants.

Materials & Methods: EEG will be recorded for 5 min during resting with eyes open (providing an unconstrained baseline condition) and also while the participant engages in a non-demanding visual target detection task for 5 min (to provide a comparison condition in which attention is directed externally). EEG will then be recorded continuously while the participant engages in meditation (breathing rhythmically whilst counting each breath) for 30 min. After the procedure is complete, EEG will again be recorded during resting for 5 min and while the participant engages in the non-demanding visual target detection during two post-meditation time intervals to assess whether changes in patterns of brain activity are sustained.

Results: This is an ongoing study (funding is being sought) and therefore there are no results at present. However, it is expected that meditation will modify low frequency oscillatory activity

Conclusion: Meditation will provide a patient-centred, non-invasive technique which might have a beneficial effect on cognitive function in schizophrenia.
1465-3753
51-52
Walker, Dawn-Marie
5d4c78b7-4411-493e-8844-b64efc72a1e8
Liddle, P.
859b244e-69a9-4336-8dd3-799ca9fda841
Walker, Dawn-Marie
5d4c78b7-4411-493e-8844-b64efc72a1e8
Liddle, P.
859b244e-69a9-4336-8dd3-799ca9fda841

(2006) Changes in theta rhythm due to meditation in patients with schizophrenia: on-going research. [in special issue: Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies] Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies, 11, supplement 1, 51-52. (doi:10.1111/j.2042-7166.2006.tb04801.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Studies suggest that theta activity can be modified by meditation techniques in healthy adults. Aftanas and Golocheikine (2001) report that during meditation, EEG patterns are characterised by increased theta power over anterior midline electrodes of both general theta and frontal midline theta processes (brainwave patterns). We propose a study to see whether meditation can modify theta activity in patients with schizophrenia (who already have impaired low frequency oscillatory activity in the theta and delta frequency bands) when compared to control participants.

Materials & Methods: EEG will be recorded for 5 min during resting with eyes open (providing an unconstrained baseline condition) and also while the participant engages in a non-demanding visual target detection task for 5 min (to provide a comparison condition in which attention is directed externally). EEG will then be recorded continuously while the participant engages in meditation (breathing rhythmically whilst counting each breath) for 30 min. After the procedure is complete, EEG will again be recorded during resting for 5 min and while the participant engages in the non-demanding visual target detection during two post-meditation time intervals to assess whether changes in patterns of brain activity are sustained.

Results: This is an ongoing study (funding is being sought) and therefore there are no results at present. However, it is expected that meditation will modify low frequency oscillatory activity

Conclusion: Meditation will provide a patient-centred, non-invasive technique which might have a beneficial effect on cognitive function in schizophrenia.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: December 2006
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372895
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372895
ISSN: 1465-3753
PURE UUID: 000b0403-5b18-49ec-b4aa-e75dc0a2d0a8
ORCID for Dawn-Marie Walker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2135-1363

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Dec 2014 13:05
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:22

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