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Meningiomas occurring during long-term survival after treatment for childhood cancer

Meningiomas occurring during long-term survival after treatment for childhood cancer
Meningiomas occurring during long-term survival after treatment for childhood cancer
Childhood cancer is rare but improvements in treatment over the past five decades have resulted in a cohort of more than 30,000 long-term survivors of childhood cancer in the UK with more added annually. These long-term survivors are at risk of late effects of cancer treatment which replace original tumour recurrence as the leading cause of premature death. Second neoplasms are a particular risk and in the central nervous system meningiomas occur increasingly with increased radiation dose to central nervous system tissue and length of time after exposure, resulting in a 500-fold increase above that expected in the normal population by 40 years of follow up. This multidisciplinary author group and others met to discuss the issue. Our pooled information, and consensus that screening should only follow symptoms, was published online by the Royal College of Radiologists in 2013. We outline here the current knowledge and management of these neoplasms secondary to childhood cancer treatment.
secondary meningiomas, radiation-induced secondary neoplasms, childhood cancer treatment, late effects
2054-2704
1-4
Sugden, E.
093929b7-4bd8-47aa-8ade-d3563ea018dd
Taylor, A.
39974814-4868-4c73-a3fa-2adfa4be3e46
Pretorius, P.
2e4be114-c4dc-45c1-bab6-911070a213b7
Kennedy, C.R.
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Bhangoo, R.
f3708c94-c7de-47ff-a6ad-c25b7a3788f6
Sugden, E.
093929b7-4bd8-47aa-8ade-d3563ea018dd
Taylor, A.
39974814-4868-4c73-a3fa-2adfa4be3e46
Pretorius, P.
2e4be114-c4dc-45c1-bab6-911070a213b7
Kennedy, C.R.
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93
Bhangoo, R.
f3708c94-c7de-47ff-a6ad-c25b7a3788f6

Sugden, E., Taylor, A., Pretorius, P., Kennedy, C.R. and Bhangoo, R. (2014) Meningiomas occurring during long-term survival after treatment for childhood cancer. JRSM Open, 5 (4), 1-4. (doi:10.1177/2054270414524567). (PMID:25057388)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Childhood cancer is rare but improvements in treatment over the past five decades have resulted in a cohort of more than 30,000 long-term survivors of childhood cancer in the UK with more added annually. These long-term survivors are at risk of late effects of cancer treatment which replace original tumour recurrence as the leading cause of premature death. Second neoplasms are a particular risk and in the central nervous system meningiomas occur increasingly with increased radiation dose to central nervous system tissue and length of time after exposure, resulting in a 500-fold increase above that expected in the normal population by 40 years of follow up. This multidisciplinary author group and others met to discuss the issue. Our pooled information, and consensus that screening should only follow symptoms, was published online by the Royal College of Radiologists in 2013. We outline here the current knowledge and management of these neoplasms secondary to childhood cancer treatment.

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Sugde, Taylor Pretorius, Kennedy - J R Soc Med Open 2014.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: April 2014
Keywords: secondary meningiomas, radiation-induced secondary neoplasms, childhood cancer treatment, late effects
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372937
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372937
ISSN: 2054-2704
PURE UUID: 1778f1af-362a-4ff7-adfe-83a9206f1308

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jan 2015 15:02
Last modified: 01 Dec 2017 17:33

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