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In-vivo RGB marking and multicolour single-cell tracking in the adult brain

In-vivo RGB marking and multicolour single-cell tracking in the adult brain
In-vivo RGB marking and multicolour single-cell tracking in the adult brain
In neuroscience it is a technical challenge to identify and follow the temporal and spatial distribution of cells as they differentiate. We hypothesised that RGB marking, the tagging of individual cells with unique hues resulting from simultaneous expression of the three basic colours red, green and blue, provides a convenient toolbox for the study of the CNS anatomy at the single-cell level. Using ?-retroviral and lentiviral vector sets we describe for the first time the in-vivo multicolour RGB marking of neurons in the adult brain. RGB marking also enabled us to track the spatial and temporal fate of neural stem cells in the adult brain. The application of different viral envelopes and promoters provided a useful approach to track the generation of neurons vs. glial cells at the neurogenic niche, allowing the identification of the prominent generation of new astrocytes to the striatum. Multicolour RGB marking could serve as a universal and reproducible method to study and manipulate the CNS at the single-cell level, in both health and disease.
genetic vectors, fluorescence imaging, neurogenesis
1-10
Gomez-Nicola, Diego
0680aa66-9dee-47cf-a8d3-e39c988f85b5
Riecken, K.
386307f1-46f2-4774-8d0a-40df7e0fe7d5
Fehse, B.
42f61f07-238b-4441-89be-aef92d350fef
Perry, V. Hugh
8f29d36a-8e1f-4082-8700-09483bbaeae4
Gomez-Nicola, Diego
0680aa66-9dee-47cf-a8d3-e39c988f85b5
Riecken, K.
386307f1-46f2-4774-8d0a-40df7e0fe7d5
Fehse, B.
42f61f07-238b-4441-89be-aef92d350fef
Perry, V. Hugh
8f29d36a-8e1f-4082-8700-09483bbaeae4

Gomez-Nicola, Diego, Riecken, K., Fehse, B. and Perry, V. Hugh (2014) In-vivo RGB marking and multicolour single-cell tracking in the adult brain. Scientific Reports, 4 (7520), 1-10. (doi:10.1038/srep07520). (PMID:25531807)

Record type: Article

Abstract

In neuroscience it is a technical challenge to identify and follow the temporal and spatial distribution of cells as they differentiate. We hypothesised that RGB marking, the tagging of individual cells with unique hues resulting from simultaneous expression of the three basic colours red, green and blue, provides a convenient toolbox for the study of the CNS anatomy at the single-cell level. Using ?-retroviral and lentiviral vector sets we describe for the first time the in-vivo multicolour RGB marking of neurons in the adult brain. RGB marking also enabled us to track the spatial and temporal fate of neural stem cells in the adult brain. The application of different viral envelopes and promoters provided a useful approach to track the generation of neurons vs. glial cells at the neurogenic niche, allowing the identification of the prominent generation of new astrocytes to the striatum. Multicolour RGB marking could serve as a universal and reproducible method to study and manipulate the CNS at the single-cell level, in both health and disease.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 November 2014
Published date: 22 December 2014
Keywords: genetic vectors, fluorescence imaging, neurogenesis
Organisations: Biomedicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 372997
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/372997
PURE UUID: 93f9fc61-e94c-4067-b67f-9dda0945d313
ORCID for Diego Gomez-Nicola: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5316-2682

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Dec 2014 15:30
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:33

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