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Condoms are more effective when applied by males: a study of young black males in the United States

Condoms are more effective when applied by males: a study of young black males in the United States
Condoms are more effective when applied by males: a study of young black males in the United States
Purpose
To determine, among a sample of young black male (YBM), whether female application of male condoms for penile–vaginal intercourse would be associated with higher or lower rates of breakage or slippage. A secondary aim was to investigate if higher rates of breakage or slippage were associated with increased odds of acquiring chlamydia and/or gonorrhea.

Methods
A cross-sectional study of 412 YBM, aged 15 to 23 years, was conducted in three US cities located in the Southern United States.

Results
Among YBM reporting frequent female application of condoms, 43.5% reported one or more instance of breakage or slippage, compared with those reporting less frequent female application (27.2%, P = .003). Among YBM reporting one or more event of breakage or slippage, 25.4% tested positive for chlamydia and/or gonorrhea. In contrast, among those not reporting breakage or slippage, 17.2% tested positive (P = .047).

Conclusions
Findings suggest that educational and behavioral interventions should seek to improve young women's skills relative to condom application and use. Further studies could also investigate whether intervention efforts should encourage some YBM to be responsible for their own condom application.
condoms, young men, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual behavior
1047-2797
868-870
Crosby, Richard A.
626c2897-4a0d-447c-8a82-b4068006646c
Milhausen, Robin R.
34cc6d84-7ab0-49a0-a3ac-054ed9b6129f
Sanders, Stephanie A.
bb4ce9a1-0d94-4fe9-9113-f2ac41ec7961
Graham, Cynthia A.
ac400331-f231-4449-a69b-ec9a477224c8
Yarber, William L.
2bf2b5cc-004a-4c27-9e88-039b532e22cf
Crosby, Richard A.
626c2897-4a0d-447c-8a82-b4068006646c
Milhausen, Robin R.
34cc6d84-7ab0-49a0-a3ac-054ed9b6129f
Sanders, Stephanie A.
bb4ce9a1-0d94-4fe9-9113-f2ac41ec7961
Graham, Cynthia A.
ac400331-f231-4449-a69b-ec9a477224c8
Yarber, William L.
2bf2b5cc-004a-4c27-9e88-039b532e22cf

Crosby, Richard A., Milhausen, Robin R., Sanders, Stephanie A., Graham, Cynthia A. and Yarber, William L. (2014) Condoms are more effective when applied by males: a study of young black males in the United States. Annals of Epidemiology, 24 (11), 868-870. (doi:10.1016/j.annepidem.2014.07.017). (PMID:25193014)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose
To determine, among a sample of young black male (YBM), whether female application of male condoms for penile–vaginal intercourse would be associated with higher or lower rates of breakage or slippage. A secondary aim was to investigate if higher rates of breakage or slippage were associated with increased odds of acquiring chlamydia and/or gonorrhea.

Methods
A cross-sectional study of 412 YBM, aged 15 to 23 years, was conducted in three US cities located in the Southern United States.

Results
Among YBM reporting frequent female application of condoms, 43.5% reported one or more instance of breakage or slippage, compared with those reporting less frequent female application (27.2%, P = .003). Among YBM reporting one or more event of breakage or slippage, 25.4% tested positive for chlamydia and/or gonorrhea. In contrast, among those not reporting breakage or slippage, 17.2% tested positive (P = .047).

Conclusions
Findings suggest that educational and behavioral interventions should seek to improve young women's skills relative to condom application and use. Further studies could also investigate whether intervention efforts should encourage some YBM to be responsible for their own condom application.

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More information

Published date: August 2014
Keywords: condoms, young men, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual behavior
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 373049
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/373049
ISSN: 1047-2797
PURE UUID: 20ecdda2-ae10-4aab-bd13-985e2c2d093f
ORCID for Cynthia A. Graham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7884-599X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jan 2015 13:39
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:30

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