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Desire to father a child and condom use: a study of young black men at risk of sexually transmitted infections

Desire to father a child and condom use: a study of young black men at risk of sexually transmitted infections
Desire to father a child and condom use: a study of young black men at risk of sexually transmitted infections
BACKGROUND:

To determine whether men's reported desire to father a child or their perception that someone wanted to have their child was associated with elevated rates of unprotected vaginal sex, among a sample of young Black men at high risk of sexually transmitted infection acquisition.

METHODS:

Data were collected in clinics treating sexually transmitted infections in three southern U.S. cities. Men 15-23 years of age who identified as Black/African American and reported recent (past two months) penile-vaginal sex were eligible (N?=?578). Logistic regression was used to examine whether desire to conceive a child (self and perception of partners' desire) predicted condom use, adjusting for age and whether they had previously impregnated someone.

RESULTS:

Their own level of desire to conceive a child was not significantly associated with unprotected vaginal sex or the proportion of times a condom was used. However, those who perceived higher level of someone wanting to conceive their child were 1.73 times more likely to report unprotected vaginal sex (P?=?.006) and 1.62 times more likely to report a lower proportion of times condoms were used (P?=?.019).

CONCLUSIONS:

Young Black men attending sexually transmitted infection clinics in the USA may forego condom use based on a perceived desire of their partners to become pregnant putting themselves at risk for sexually transmitted infection acquisition and unplanned pregnancy. Findings provide initial support for the relevance of the idea that perceptions of women partners' desire to conceive may be a critical determinant of condomless sex.
condoms, young black men, pregnancy desire, sexually transmitted infections, sexual behavior
Crosby, R.A.
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Graham, C.A.
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Milhausen, R.R.
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Sanders, S.A.
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Yarber, W.L.
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Salazar, L.F.
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Terrell, I.
6108ca5b-6dc0-439d-ace7-2b915537fc49
Pasternak, R.
0b7f5083-ea2d-44e9-a519-8a94d85fefa5
Crosby, R.A.
0b06658b-f41c-4cb5-ad3b-cb74a6c0d025
Graham, C.A.
ac400331-f231-4449-a69b-ec9a477224c8
Milhausen, R.R.
f79a950c-4c90-491c-b7f4-7d9c6e12caf6
Sanders, S.A.
ee62f688-1001-4976-824e-bd9cd7f523e6
Yarber, W.L.
4080671d-cfd7-4296-b3e2-2c87203cd739
Salazar, L.F.
064a8a7f-9303-4046-9fcd-47667b3de58c
Terrell, I.
6108ca5b-6dc0-439d-ace7-2b915537fc49
Pasternak, R.
0b7f5083-ea2d-44e9-a519-8a94d85fefa5

Crosby, R.A., Graham, C.A., Milhausen, R.R., Sanders, S.A., Yarber, W.L., Salazar, L.F., Terrell, I. and Pasternak, R. (2014) Desire to father a child and condom use: a study of young black men at risk of sexually transmitted infections. International Journal of STD & AIDS. (doi:10.1177/0956462414563623). (PMID:25505038)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To determine whether men's reported desire to father a child or their perception that someone wanted to have their child was associated with elevated rates of unprotected vaginal sex, among a sample of young Black men at high risk of sexually transmitted infection acquisition.

METHODS:

Data were collected in clinics treating sexually transmitted infections in three southern U.S. cities. Men 15-23 years of age who identified as Black/African American and reported recent (past two months) penile-vaginal sex were eligible (N?=?578). Logistic regression was used to examine whether desire to conceive a child (self and perception of partners' desire) predicted condom use, adjusting for age and whether they had previously impregnated someone.

RESULTS:

Their own level of desire to conceive a child was not significantly associated with unprotected vaginal sex or the proportion of times a condom was used. However, those who perceived higher level of someone wanting to conceive their child were 1.73 times more likely to report unprotected vaginal sex (P?=?.006) and 1.62 times more likely to report a lower proportion of times condoms were used (P?=?.019).

CONCLUSIONS:

Young Black men attending sexually transmitted infection clinics in the USA may forego condom use based on a perceived desire of their partners to become pregnant putting themselves at risk for sexually transmitted infection acquisition and unplanned pregnancy. Findings provide initial support for the relevance of the idea that perceptions of women partners' desire to conceive may be a critical determinant of condomless sex.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 12 December 2014
Keywords: condoms, young black men, pregnancy desire, sexually transmitted infections, sexual behavior
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 373051
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/373051
PURE UUID: 7255baef-c889-40e9-8c57-41e040c6b46a
ORCID for C.A. Graham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7884-599X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jan 2015 13:50
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:43

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